Southeast Asian pregnant women tend to use smokeless tobacco

The UK’s Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has said pregnant women unable to quit should be offered financial incentives to help them achieve their goal.

The study analyzed survey data from 1.3 million women aged 15 to 49 in 42 low- and middle-income countries. A total of 80,454 women among the participants were pregnant, and their smoking behavior was compared to that of non-pregnant participants.

The research team found that pregnant women were “seven percent more likely to use smokeless tobacco than non-pregnant women.” Study author Radha Shukla, a doctoral student in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York, UK, said the situation in Southeast Asia contrasts with that in high-income countries. where tobacco consumption is lower among pregnant women.

“This is of particular concern and raises the need to develop tailored interventions to help women reduce or quit smoking…particularly when pregnant…due to adverse pregnancy outcomes,” Shukla said. “This not only includes smoking, but also the use of smokeless tobacco, which is often chewed, snuffed or applied topically to the oral cavity.”

Pregnant smokers should benefit from “opt-out smoking cessation services”

Meanwhile, the UK’s Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has said pregnant women unable to quit smoking should be offered financial incentives to help them achieve their goal. The RCP said that at any point of contact with the NHS, smokers should receive “opt-out smoking cessation services”. Additionally, the group said, bearing in mind that most smokers often belong to “lower socio-economic groups”, pregnant women should be provided with financial incentives to motivate them to reach the goal.

These suggestions have been put forward as part of a report compiled by the RCP, discussing what can be done to achieve the government’s ‘Smoke Free 2030’ target. Unfortunately, recent data has indicated that, as things stand, the target will not actually be achieved until 2050.

“The ability of the UK and other countries to tackle major public health challenges is beyond doubt; the Covid-19 pandemic, by far the biggest new challenge to health in the UK and around the world in decades, has attracted a public health and economic response on a scale unique in the modern age,” we read in the report. “Yet in 2020, when Covid-19 killed around 80,000 UK citizens, smoking killed 94,000.”

Read further: News-Medical

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