Community tend – Muirfield Community http://muirfieldcommunity.org/ Tue, 24 May 2022 00:18:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-14-70x70.png Community tend – Muirfield Community http://muirfieldcommunity.org/ 32 32 Another Racist Mass Shooting and Our Failure to Herd Jesus’ Sheep – Baptist News Global https://muirfieldcommunity.org/another-racist-mass-shooting-and-our-failure-to-herd-jesus-sheep-baptist-news-global/ Thu, 19 May 2022 10:07:10 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/another-racist-mass-shooting-and-our-failure-to-herd-jesus-sheep-baptist-news-global/ In worship on May 1, Village Baptist Church read together the words of Jesus when he asks his disciple: “Peter, do you love me? When Peter responds to Jesus, “Of course, Lord, you know that I love you,” Jesus gives him a simple directive: “Guard my sheep” (John 21:15-19). From the beginning of our scriptures, […]]]>

In worship on May 1, Village Baptist Church read together the words of Jesus when he asks his disciple: “Peter, do you love me? When Peter responds to Jesus, “Of course, Lord, you know that I love you,” Jesus gives him a simple directive: “Guard my sheep” (John 21:15-19).

From the beginning of our scriptures, God unequivocally declares that human beings are made in the image of God. All human beings bear the image of God. No exception.

Emily Holladay

On Sunday morning we will hear the words of Jesus saying, “I leave you alone; I give you my peace” (John 14:27). The same Savior who told his disciples that “those who live by the sword shall perish by the sword” (Matthew 26:52) implores them to accept his peace so they can spread his message in word and deed .

Saturday, May 14, 13 people were shot at a Buffalo grocery store in a predominantly black neighborhood. Eleven of those 13 people were black and 10 died. Ten people created in the image of God are buried because of hatred and violence. And this story has become too commonplace.

According to the Anti-Defamation League, approximately 450 murders have been committed by political extremists in the United States over the past decade. More than half of them were perpetrated by people espousing a message of white supremacy.

One of the earliest Christian baptismal beliefs is quoted by the apostle Paul in his letter to the Galatians: “There is no more Jew or Greek; there is no longer a slave or a free; there is no more male and female, because you are all one in Jesus Christ.

White supremacy, replacement theory or any view that values ​​one human being above another is contrary to Christian witness. And yet, many people who commit these atrocious acts and express such hateful opinions do so in the name of Christianity.

As followers of Christ, we cannot remain silent in the face of such evil. In the words of Wayne AI Fredrick, President of Howard University: “Although we have grown accustomed to these recurring tragedies, we can never tolerate their regularity. No matter how frequent, racist mass shootings are not inevitable, and we must not allow ourselves to perceive them as such.

Although this particular tragedy did not take place in our community, we must not remain silent until such a tragedy comes to our doorstep. As people seeking to build a Beloved Community, we must boldly proclaim the love of a Creator who formed each of us in the image of God and left us with one task: Herd my sheep.

“We guard Christ’s sheep by ensuring that wolves cannot harm God’s beloved children.”

We tend the sheep of Christ ensuring that wolves cannot harm God’s beloved children.

We tend to Christ’s sheep by raising young people to value kindness, justice and humility above prejudice and violence.

We guard Christ’s sheep by speaking up—and speaking with—when the sheep are hurt.

Certainly, we pray for the lives of those who were lost senselessly on Saturday. But we don’t stop there. We continue on this journey to become a beacon for our community emanating from love, drowning out hate and caring for the sheep of Christ so that all may know the peace that Christ intended.

Emily Holladay is pastor of the Village Baptist Church in Bowie, Maryland.

Related Articles:

Buffalo massacre is further evidence of white Christian nationalism, sociologists say

El Paso shooting puts Christian nationalism on trial

I am a pastor who refuses to offer “thoughts and prayers” for these people | Opinion of Wendell Griffen

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“I felt so sick and I was so sick, but women tend to go on and say we’re great” https://muirfieldcommunity.org/i-felt-so-sick-and-i-was-so-sick-but-women-tend-to-go-on-and-say-were-great/ Mon, 16 May 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/i-felt-so-sick-and-i-was-so-sick-but-women-tend-to-go-on-and-say-were-great/ Originally from Balscadden, Ingrid is married to Noel Dunne and the couple will soon be celebrating their 20th wedding anniversary. They have three children Neala (13), Nisha (12) and Charlie (6). Previous Following Image 1 of 3 Originally from Balscadden, Ingrid is married to Noel Dunne and the couple will soon be celebrating their 20th […]]]>

Originally from Balscadden, Ingrid is married to Noel Dunne and the couple will soon be celebrating their 20th wedding anniversary. They have three children Neala (13), Nisha (12) and Charlie (6).

A mother of three from Gormanston who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was just 45 says many women don’t know the symptoms of the disease and points out that it can often be diagnosed wrongly as something else.

Ingrid Halligan Dunne is taking part in an Irish Network of Gynecological Oncology (INGO) awareness campaign which aims to highlight the symptoms of ovarian cancer through their ‘BEAT’ message and she is one of three women who feature on their video campaign.

BEAT stands for persistent bloating that doesn’t come and go; eat less and feel full faster; abdominal and pelvic pain that you feel almost every day; and toilet changes in urination or bowel habits.

Ingrid urges women to be aware of the symptoms and that if they feel unwell and have any of the symptoms, make sure they go get checked out. She also said many women thought it only affected older women, but she was only 45 when she was diagnosed with stage three ovarian cancer.

“I felt so sick and I was so sick, but women tend to go on and say we’re grand. That’s the problem, it’s going on and I don’t know any women who have been diagnosed with stage 1 or 2.

“If there is a woman running around at school or at work who is not feeling well, please go and do something about it.

“Women, especially in Ireland, are so resilient and think they can go on and say I’ll be great. We need to get them in a little earlier. If I could stand up and shout that, I would,” Ingrid said.

Originally from Balscadden, Ingrid is married to Noel Dunne and the couple will soon be celebrating their 20th wedding anniversary. They have three children Neala (13), Nisha (12) and Charlie (6).

Ingrid explained how difficult it can be to diagnose ovarian cancer and because of this it is usually in an advanced stage before it is detected. She also pointed out that a smear test does not detect it and this is also a misconception that many women have.

“There’s not a single test that picks it up. If you have the symptoms, go to the doctor and push for a CT scan and a CA125 blood test can also help indicate that.”

Ingrid recalled that her symptoms began in January 2019. “I was at the doctor and was told it was irritable bowel syndrome. mom with three children, the youngest was only three at the time.

“I was 45. There’s a misconception that ovarian cancer only affects older women, that’s not necessarily the case. In May 2019 I had a CT scan and then a MRI in July and then there was a big panic in August when they realized it was ovarian cancer.”

At this point, Ingrid said she felt terrible.

“I was very bloated and felt full most of the time. I also had terrible back pain. And I was quite short of breath.”

The moment she was diagnosed, Ingrid says she knew something was wrong.

“I was getting worse and worse and always running around with the kids and blaming it on busy mum syndrome. That’s something I would say to all mums in all playgrounds. If you’re feeling wrong and something is wrong, please get checked out.”

Ingrid underwent major surgery in August 2019, spending two weeks in hospital, followed by chemotherapy.

She explained that the cancer had spread to organs around her ovaries and she needed cytoreduction surgery. Ingrid had her ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes removed along with her appendix and it spread to the lining of her abdomen.

“The main point I want to drive home is that people are unaware of the symptoms and they are often misdiagnosed. When detected they tend to be at a later stage and more extensive surgery is so necessary. If it had happened at stage one or two, maybe I should have just had my ovaries removed.”

Ingrid is taking part in a video campaign to highlight the symptoms and said two other women in the video with her were all diagnosed in their 40s and had undergone similar surgery.

She said the treatment was difficult but you just keep on reaching the goal – getting to the end of the treatment.

She is doing well and initially had scans every three months, but this has recently been pushed back to every six months.

“In the middle of diagnosis and then surgery and chemo, the end goal is in sight and you have to get there. When it’s over, you don’t have the same energy and all of a sudden you have to reintegrating you into the world. but you’re not the person you used to be. You don’t have the same energy and you have to take care of yourself.”

Speaking to other women who have had the operation, Ingrid said they all say the same thing, that they don’t feel able to work full time.

“I am an independent accountant, I still work but I don’t do as much as before.”

She said her husband Noel, family and friends have all been extremely supportive and she cannot thank the people of the local community enough for all they have done for her.

World Ovarian Cancer Awareness Day took place on Sunday with 10 buildings across Ireland lit up in the campaign teal color as part of the awareness campaign.

About 400 cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed each year in Ireland. The Irish Network of Gynecological Oncology (INGO) campaign aims to communicate the symptoms of ovarian cancer to a wider audience and to highlight the lack of awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms and the misperception that a cervical screening detects ovarian cancer.

Symptoms of ovarian cancer can often be mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome, but the INGO says this rarely presents for the first time in a woman over 50.

As part of the BEAT campaign, Irish artist and fashion designer Helen Steele has designed a tote bag spelling out BEAT to raise awareness of the symptoms of ovarian cancer. Poet Laureate from Wexford, Sasha Terfous has written and performed a spoken word piece, spelling out the symptoms of ovarian cancer.

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Merrillville High School students tend to the community garden | Merrillville https://muirfieldcommunity.org/merrillville-high-school-students-tend-to-the-community-garden-merrillville/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/merrillville-high-school-students-tend-to-the-community-garden-merrillville/ Abigail Elenz, left, and Donnyell Day transplant snow peas into a larger planter in the community garden at Merrillville High School. John J. Watkins, The Times MERRILLVILLE — Classes at Merrillville High School were over for the day, but ninth-grader Donnyell Day stayed. Day and two other students were helping to tend the potato, onion […]]]>





Abigail Elenz, left, and Donnyell Day transplant snow peas into a larger planter in the community garden at Merrillville High School.


John J. Watkins, The Times


MERRILLVILLE — Classes at Merrillville High School were over for the day, but ninth-grader Donnyell Day stayed.

Day and two other students were helping to tend the potato, onion and other vegetable plantations on Tuesday in fenced beds east of the school.

“I love creating something out of nothing,” Day said of her after-school volunteer work.

This was all part of the Community Garden’s inauguration event.

The community garden, which is open to students and staff at Merrillville High School, actually started two years ago, Patti Tubbs-Clark said.

Tubbs-Clark is Culinary Director for Family and Consumer Science classes.

A sign at the front of the garden reads: ‘Please feel free to pull a few weeds or grab a few items from the garden, but remember this is for the community so leave some for the next person.”

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The garden space will be maintained by Girl Scout Troop #30351, part of Abigail Elenz’s Gold Star Award project; MHS Culinary Arts; and Special Educator Beth O’Halek’s class.







Merrillville High School students plant a community garden

As students wait to board buses to go home, Chloe Smith waters vegetables in the community garden at Merrillville High School.


John J. Watkins, The Times


“It (the community garden) went well and last year we put away 20 liters of tomatoes,” Tubbs-Clark said.

Tubbs-Clark said the impetus for the garden is the whole farm-to-table movement and providing more environmentally friendly food.

“I see him staying,” Tubbs-Clark said of the move.

She said the shift to the farm-to-table movement in high school began two years ago, before COVID, with her students planting, visiting farms and seeing farm animals, including chickens, up close. .

“We also went to farmers markets,” Tubbs-Clark said.

Potatoes, easy to grow, were part of the initial planting in high school, as was the placement of the strawberry walls.







Merrillville High School students plant a community garden

Donnyell Day, left, Abigail Elenz and Chole Smith examine the many vegetables that will eventually need to be transplanted into the community garden at Merrillville High School.


John J. Watkins, The Times


Most of the plants in this year’s garden were planted by students in her classes in February, including tomatoes, peppers and herbs.

“Some of the seeds took and some didn’t,” Tubbs-Clark said.

Many unused plants in the garden are available to students and staff on tables and shelves set up next to the garden, Tubbs-Clark said.

“We encourage students and teachers to bring their own pots and create a mini garden they can take home,” she said.

Baby chickens, newly hatched after 21 days of incubation inside the school, were also brought into the garden for their first glimpse of the outdoors, Tubbs-Clark said.







Merrillville High School students plant a community garden

Students raise chickens at the community garden at Merrillville High School.


John J. Watkins, The Times


Chloe Smith, a ninth-grader and member of the school’s culinary club, stayed after school to help fellow ninth-grader Abigail Elenz.

“I just wanted to collaborate with her,” Smith said.

Smith said her family had a garden in their home and she learned a lot from her father, so she had a good base.

“My dad helped me understand gardening,” Smith said.

Elenz said the garden was maintained by her and Troop 30351, with the end being that she won the Gold Star Award, Girl Scouting’s most prestigious award.

“I love planting a garden and watching it grow,” Elenz said.

Those wishing to donate items for the flower beds or garden can contact Melinda Henderson, Troop Leader 30351, at 219-779-1504.

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Watermark Art Center is looking for volunteers to tend the community pollinator garden – Bemidji Pioneer https://muirfieldcommunity.org/watermark-art-center-is-looking-for-volunteers-to-tend-the-community-pollinator-garden-bemidji-pioneer/ Tue, 10 May 2022 18:28:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/watermark-art-center-is-looking-for-volunteers-to-tend-the-community-pollinator-garden-bemidji-pioneer/ BEMIDJI — Community members, student groups and clubs interested in native plants are invited to help maintain Watermark’s pollinator gardens this summer. “Green thumb or not, lend a hand to help bring beauty and biodiversity to the community of downtown Bemidji,” a statement read. Weather permitting, the Garden Team will meet twice a month throughout […]]]>

BEMIDJI — Community members, student groups and clubs interested in native plants are invited to help maintain Watermark’s pollinator gardens this summer.

“Green thumb or not, lend a hand to help bring beauty and biodiversity to the community of downtown Bemidji,” a statement read.

Weather permitting, the Garden Team will meet twice a month throughout the summer from 4-6pm on the second and fourth Tuesdays through August. General duties include weeding, pruning and debris removal.

Depending on the season, there may be opportunities to divide perennials or collect seeds. Watermark will have an assortment of gardening tools, but encourages volunteers to bring their own gloves and tools.

Watermark, located at 505 Bemidji Ave. N, is looking for volunteers to help maintain his pollinator garden this summer.

Contributed

All skill levels are welcome. No registration is necessary, volunteers are welcome to come at their convenience, but larger groups should call ahead if possible.

More volunteer information, including the history of the garden, is available at watermarkartcenter.org/pollinator-rain-gardens or by calling (218)-444-7570.

Watermark is free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and is located at 505 Bemidji Ave. NOT.

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Obe Ejikeme: “Anti-growth rotations are often short and valuable companies tend to peel off” https://muirfieldcommunity.org/obe-ejikeme-anti-growth-rotations-are-often-short-and-valuable-companies-tend-to-peel-off/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 13:02:33 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/obe-ejikeme-anti-growth-rotations-are-often-short-and-valuable-companies-tend-to-peel-off/ Companies that can grow on their own are where Carmignac fund manager Obe Ejikeme wants to put his money. And by “his money,” Ejikeme does not mean figuratively. Most Carmignac employees have some sort of long-term investment in the business, “but I take it a step further,” he says. When investors are interested in the […]]]>

Companies that can grow on their own are where Carmignac fund manager Obe Ejikeme wants to put his money. And by “his money,” Ejikeme does not mean figuratively.

Most Carmignac employees have some sort of long-term investment in the business, “but I take it a step further,” he says. When investors are interested in the FP Carmignac Global Equity Compounders Fund, “I want them to know that I am fully aligned with them”.

To this end, Ejikeme has invested his entire self-invested personal pension (Sipp) as well as his and his wife’s (Isas) individual savings accounts and their children’s junior Isas into it. Such is his belief in the way the fund, which he co-manages with head of equities Mark Denham, is managed.

From science to SICAVs

Becoming a fund manager was not always on the agenda for Ejikeme, who studied computer science at university. “I got into finance through an unusual route because they usually hire people with MBAs and business experience.”

His career path veered into financial services when he joined financial data and software company FactSet after graduating. He then spent seven years at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, where he was responsible for European equities and quantitative strategy.

“At Merrill Lynch, my day job was to talk to portfolio managers and all the big fund managers about equities: where to invest, in which regions and in which styles – value versus growth, etc.”

Ejikeme’s background in technology has served him well. As fund management companies increasingly rely on screens and filters, tech-savvy people are in greater demand.

He joined Carmignac in 2014 as a quantitative equity analyst, then partnered with Denham to co-manage a trio of funds: two SICAVs and global equity aggregators Oiec. “We think very, very similarly, which is why the partnership works so well.”

Sicavs will hit a three-year high in May this year, with the UK-domiciled compound growth fund hitting the two-year mark in the same month.

First rule: don’t panic

Compounders are defined as companies with high sustainable profitability that reinject these gains into future growth. The £53million fund holds 40-60 shares. The objective is to invest in these companies between three and five years. The annual turnover was not more than three shares per year.

According to the February 2022 fact sheet, the largest stake is Microsoft (6.64%), followed by US medical device maker Resmed (3.59%) and Danish pharmaceutical giant Novo Nordisk (3.35%) .

Between them, IT and health account for just over 58% of assets. Since inception in May 2020, the benchmark independent fund has generated a return of 30.35%. For context, the MSCI World Index rose 37.3% over this period.

But growth investing and tech stocks both started 2022 with a bump, so it’s no surprise to see the fund underperform at the start of the year. This, combined with rising inflation and the Russian invasion of Ukraine, saw the Oiec compound down 13.61% in the two months to the end of February. The MSCI World index fell by 6.81% over the same period.

“As fund managers, the one thing you absolutely don’t do is panic,” says Ejikeme. “We had a difficult start to the year due to this rotation from growth to value, with investors looking for cheap commodities and stocks.

“We had three last year: the first peaked in March, the second in May and the third in October. But, at the end of the year, these same companies were trading at relatively low levels.

“These “anti-growth” rotations are often short. You have to be careful because of the style of these valuable companies, they always seem to come off. But investment style is far from the only concern of investors today.

“Today, there is a lot of fear that inflation is high. But Rule 101 of investing is that inflation is always a lagging indicator of the cycle. The time when you worry about inflation is usually when it’s not the thing to worry about.

Growth prospects, “which have been an issue for the past 10 years and will continue to be an issue,” are a much bigger topic of conversation, he says.

drown in debt

Beyond understanding a company’s growth prospects, Ejikeme wants to know how that growth is funded.

With borrowing having been incredibly cheap over the past decade, investors in leveraged companies with weak growth prospects should be concerned. “As a simple metric, we look at the percentage of S&P 500 companies that have net debt greater than four times EBITDA. This gives us a measure of the percentage of the market that will be in distress if interest rates start to rise. .

He adds: “The overarching philosophy of the fund is that we only invest in companies that can grow on their own and have done so over the past five years. Second, we are careful not to invest in companies that have very high levels of debt. »

Currently, the net debt to Ebitda of the fund is around 0%, he says. “In fact, 40% of the companies we hold are net cash, versus a market that’s around 1.5%.”

Keep it sustainable

The Global Equity Compounders fund was also created with sustainability at its heart. “We focus specifically on businesses that we believe will have a positive impact on society.”

A total of 82% of the stocks in the portfolio generate more than half of their income from one of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, Ejikeme said.

“Investors in the UK are getting into it, but in Europe it’s essential. When investors see sectors that we don’t own performing well, for example energy or materials, they understand because they know that investing in these companies does not meet our sustainability criteria.

The fund will not invest in companies with an MSCI ESG score equal to or lower than CCC. Just over 30% of the fund’s holdings are rated AAA, and a similar number are at AA.

Want versus Need

Ejikeme says the “biggest anomaly” in the market this year “is the massive disconnect between what the credit market is doing versus the equity market.”

“The equity market rewards companies for indebtedness, while the credit market penalizes them for it.”

He adds: “Despite all the stories of rate hikes, we haven’t seen the equity market adjust in the same way as the credit market. But I think that will be a different story for the rest of the year.

This inconsistency, in a macroeconomic environment littered with conflagrations of varying sizes, all competing for attention, strengthens the case for investing in sustainable high-growth companies that are not significantly leveraged, adds- he.

“You will be better positioned for times of uncertainty, like the one we are heading into now.”

Beyond sustainable growth and low leverage, another stock-picking filter the fund is currently deploying is whether a company is making a product that meets a genuine need. Since the global financial crisis, there have been four downturns, “all of which ended the same way,” says Ejikeme.

“With defensive stocks doing very well. When times are really, really tough, people focus on the businesses we need rather than the businesses we want.

Consumer staples make up just over 10% of the fund, which includes a 2% position in Colgate. “It provides products and services that we believe consumers will need rather than owning, say, a car company.” The fund has no exposure to hypercyclical sectors such as energy, banks and materials, given their “significant sensitivity to the global macroeconomic cycle”.

“Three to four year cycles traditionally give you 18 to 24 months up and the same down, on average,” says Ejikeme.

“I think we are just five months after things went downhill. So using my analogy of 18 to 24 months, we have at least six to 12 months, if not potentially more, of the market to get used to a slower growth environment.

Work to make the compound fund more defensive began last summer. “We are making subtle changes to ensure we are positioned where investors need to be in the next six to 12 months.”

US-led global slowdown

Earnings growth across the S&P 500 was 50% last year and is expected to drop to 10% this year, he says. “This is the biggest slowdown in US earnings since emerging from the financial crisis in 2010. This kind of slowdown requires a very different portfolio, which is why we started repositioning as early as last June.”

But moving away from the US to, say, the unloved and “cheap” UK is not necessarily an option.

While the most skilled part of the equity market is on track for a significant slowdown, Ejikeme says investors should expect other parts of the markets to “slow much more.” “You can buy a cheap set of tyres, which is good until it rains. Then you would have liked to pay more.

“Most low valuation companies are generally cheap because they are cyclical. They are very sensitive to global growth cycles and if growth slows down you will find out why they are cheap at the bottom, probably because they have large debts.

Purchase opportunity

The steady deluge of negative headlines has managed to push consumer and retail investor confidence to levels not seen since the global financial crisis.

“My peers in the professional investment community have never been more optimistic about the prospects for growth than they are right now. When I talk to clients who are considering investing, it sounds like a huge opportunity to purchase for those who focus on the long term.

“If you are a long-term investor, now is the time to increase your exposure.”

This article first appeared in the April issue of Portfolio Adviser magazine.

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“The performing arts tend to unite people like nothing else does” https://muirfieldcommunity.org/the-performing-arts-tend-to-unite-people-like-nothing-else-does/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 02:59:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/the-performing-arts-tend-to-unite-people-like-nothing-else-does/ Until a few years ago, dance, music, theater were limited to fun activities and theses or library books. It was as if our unique cultural identity would soon be diluted by the influx of media. Though over the years the importance of performing arts has been debated and discussed many times and the importance of […]]]>

Until a few years ago, dance, music, theater were limited to fun activities and theses or library books. It was as if our unique cultural identity would soon be diluted by the influx of media. Though over the years the importance of performing arts has been debated and discussed many times and the importance of teaching these arts to Indian youth cannot be undermined, but nothing much has changed.

Digitization has resulted in the influx of various media forums and the perception of the arts has started to change with what is seen and heard in the name of the arts. The youth are constantly bombarded with visuals of Bollywood songs and music videos that dilute and alienate the original art forms; even schools and colleges encourage performances of songs, dances and plays around them; it becomes even more crucial to re-emphasize our cultural and artistic awareness.

Educators have realized the intrinsic value of the performing arts in curricula and also as stand-alone courses. Performing arts cannot be limited to role-playing or a little dance; the versatile and transferable skills acquired through them are important. The pedagogues underline that learning the performing arts nourishes the mind, the body and the emotions, in a collaboration, essential to live well and face the adversaries of life. The performing arts might have seemed fun and a bit challenging, but eventually the belief was restored. There is no doubt that it not only sharpens the learner’s creativity, stimulates intelligence, but also teaches compassion and empathy. This leads to a better understanding of humanity, making performers/learners critical thinkers. By studying and learning the performing arts, students gain vital skills for the future: critical appreciation and knowledge of artistic techniques, and insight into the cultural nuances of dance, theater, music.

Through various studies, over the years, performing arts have been proven to encourage learners to explore their emotions, expand their imaginations and build their own unique voice. Music, dance and drama synchronize a learner’s brain, body and emotions in many ways and build their confidence and help them find joy in self-expression, thereby broadening their horizons.

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Bitcoin investors tend to have low financial literacy, BoC study finds https://muirfieldcommunity.org/bitcoin-investors-tend-to-have-low-financial-literacy-boc-study-finds/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/bitcoin-investors-tend-to-have-low-financial-literacy-boc-study-finds/ Based on a series of surveys, central bank researchers found that around 5% of Canadians owned bitcoin between 2018 and 2020.Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press According to a new study from the Bank of Canada, Canadian bitcoin owners tend to have low levels of financial literacy while being exposed to high levels of financial risk. Based […]]]>

Based on a series of surveys, central bank researchers found that around 5% of Canadians owned bitcoin between 2018 and 2020.Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

According to a new study from the Bank of Canada, Canadian bitcoin owners tend to have low levels of financial literacy while being exposed to high levels of financial risk.

Based on a series of surveys, central bank researchers found that around 5% of Canadians owned bitcoin between 2018 and 2020. This ownership was “concentrated among educated young men with high family incomes and low financial literacy,” the researchers said in a paper summarizing the survey results released this week.

Researchers found that bitcoin owners tend to have better knowledge of how bitcoin technology works than non-owners, but score lower on general financial knowledge questions. At the same time, “Canadians who are financially literate are more likely to know bitcoin [than the average Canadian] but less likely to possess it,” the researchers said.

The surveys, conducted annually between 2016 and 2020, highlight the risk of investing in the volatile and lightly regulated asset class. About half of current or past bitcoin owners who responded to surveys said they had been affected by negative events, such as a price crash, scam, or data breach.

The Bank of Canada has been tracking the adoption of cryptocurrencies since 2016 to see how they are being used and whether they pose a challenge to the existing monetary and payment system. So far, owning cryptocurrency remains relatively limited in Canada, and most people treat it as an investment rather than a means of payment.

Around 15% of bitcoin owners who responded to the 2019 survey said their primary reason for owning the asset was to make payments.

It’s time to start thinking about bitcoin as separate from the rest of crypto

WonderFi, backed by Kevin O’Leary, buys Coinberry, second Canadian crypto exchange in less than a month

The last survey included in the research paper was conducted in November 2020, which means the research misses the spike in cryptocurrency prices at the end of 2020 and into 2021. It also does not take into account the recent regulatory changes, such as the approval of cryptocurrency exchange-traded funds in 2021, which may have expanded ownership.

A pair of surveys conducted by KPMG in 2021 and early 2022 revealed higher levels of cryptocurrency adoption, including among institutional investors. Thirty-two percent of respondents to a survey of institutional investors said they had been exposed to crypto assets, while 13 percent of respondents to a separate survey of retail investors said they had purchased crypto assets.

Research from the Bank of Canada suggests that crypto investors should be aware of the risks that come with the asset class. Eighteen percent of current or past bitcoin owners surveyed by the bank said they experienced a price crash, 14% said they lost access to their digital wallets, and 12% said they participated in an initial bitcoin offering. parts that ended. to be a scam.

Volatility in cryptocurrency prices as well as a history of fraud in the industry – including the collapse of crypto exchange QuadrigaCX in Canada – have raised financial stability concerns.

In its most recent report on financial stability, published last May, the Bank of Canada stated that “these markets are not systemically important in Canada, neither as an asset class nor as a payment instrument.

“But that could change if a big tech company — a so-called Big Tech — with a large user base decides to issue a cryptocurrency that becomes widely accepted as a form of payment,” the bank said.

The Bank of Canada is developing a prototype for its own central bank digital currency (CBDC) – a kind of digital money that can be used for online payments. The federal government has not yet given the green light to launch a CBDC, but the central bank is working on plans in case the government gives it the green light.

There are two main reasons why central banks might want to develop their own CBDC: a collapse in the physical use of cash or the widespread adoption of cryptocurrencies or other private digital assets, both of which could undermine the position of central banks at the heart of the payment system. and its ability to conduct monetary policy. So far, nothing has happened.

The federal government’s 2022 budget announced plans for a review of financial sector legislation that will examine cryptocurrencies and other digital assets.

Cryptocurrencies have become a hot political topic in recent months, with Conservative Party leadership candidate Pierre Poilievre touting bitcoin and promising to make Canada the “blockchain and crypto capital of the world.”

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Parents who share photos of children on social media tend to have a friendly parenting style, study finds https://muirfieldcommunity.org/parents-who-share-photos-of-children-on-social-media-tend-to-have-a-friendly-parenting-style-study-finds/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/parents-who-share-photos-of-children-on-social-media-tend-to-have-a-friendly-parenting-style-study-finds/ NNA | Update: April 16, 2022 2:29 p.m. STI Orlando Florida) [US]Apr 16 (ANI): According to a new study, parents who share photos of their children on social networking sites tend to have a more friend-like parenting style and allow their children to use social media at a later date. younger age.The results of the […]]]>



NNA |
Update:
April 16, 2022 2:29 p.m. STI

Orlando Florida) [US]Apr 16 (ANI): According to a new study, parents who share photos of their children on social networking sites tend to have a more friend-like parenting style and allow their children to use social media at a later date. younger age.
The results of the study have been published in the journal “Computing Machinery”.
These parents also tend to share messages beyond small networks of family and friends, regularly posting to more public networks, which raises privacy and security concerns. The results also showed that parents don’t see parental sharing as much different from regular photo sharing and rarely ask their young children for their input.
“There is no doubt that many parents are very careful about what they share online about their children. And there are significant benefits to sharing photos with grandparents and groups who can offer a support and help keep families connected. But we need to be aware of some of the privacy issues when sharing information about children online and conduct further research to determine the long-term impacts. All of this is still so We’re still learning,” said Mary Jean Amon, an assistant professor in the School of Modeling, Simulation, and Training (SMST) at UCF who is one of the study’s researchers.
The UCF research team surveyed 493 parents who regularly use social media and have children under the age of 10.
“We wanted to examine what parents consider private when it comes to sharing information about young children online and the perceived risks,” Amon said.
“We were surprised. Unlike previous research that highlights significant benefits of parental sharing, our study finds that such sharing of children’s photos is associated with permissive parenting styles. This means that parental sharing is linked to the fact that parents have friendlier relationships with their children and offer less guidance than other parents. Notably, permissive parenting has been linked to problematic internet use in children,” she added.

The research team’s findings also suggest that parents do not distinguish between parental sharing (sharing photos of their children) and general sharing of photos on social media and therefore may be underestimating the unique risks involved. sharing photos of children online and early engagement of children on social media. age.
The study found that most parents surveyed were comfortable sharing photos and sharing their photos with others. Most parents felt relatively comfortable with other adults sharing their children’s photos and anticipated that the child would appreciate the photos posted, rather than be embarrassed by them.
Although the Children’s Online Privacy Act provides many rules to protect children, the data does not lie and shows that many children interact with social media at an early age. Social media platforms have a minimum age for use (13), but without a verification system, it’s not uncommon to see children – some very young with their own YouTube channels or TikTok accounts.
About a third of parents of children ages 7 to 9 said their children use social media apps through phones or tablets, according to the 2021 CS Mott Children’s Hospital National Health Survey. About half of parents with children aged 10 to 12 said the same.
In the survey, the team asked about how often a parent posted their children’s photos, as well as their own social media activity.
Other questions focused on their children’s interests and behavior on social media, as well as how parents made the decision to post photos of their children. Participants had accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Pinterest, TikTok, Myspace and Flickr, with most users favoring Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in that order.
The study raised important questions about the comfort and privacy of young children when introduced to social media. Research in this area also aims to help parents who use this mode of communication to support them in the education of their children.
“There are broader questions about children’s privacy in social media, where a central question remains as to how much autonomy and control children, including children of different ages, should have over their photos and information online,” Amon said. (ANI)

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Fossil fuels tend to support despotism, while sun and wind are much closer to democracy. | Forum https://muirfieldcommunity.org/fossil-fuels-tend-to-support-despotism-while-sun-and-wind-are-much-closer-to-democracy-forum/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/fossil-fuels-tend-to-support-despotism-while-sun-and-wind-are-much-closer-to-democracy-forum/ At first glance, last autumn’s Glasgow climate summit looked a lot like its 25 predecessors. But as I wandered the hallways and streets outside, I realized a lot had changed since the last major climate conference in Paris in 2015 – and not just because carbon levels and the temperature had risen more and more. […]]]>

At first glance, last autumn’s Glasgow climate summit looked a lot like its 25 predecessors. But as I wandered the hallways and streets outside, I realized a lot had changed since the last major climate conference in Paris in 2015 – and not just because carbon levels and the temperature had risen more and more.

The biggest change has been in the political climate. In those few years, the world seemed to have moved sharply away from democracy and towards autocracy – and in doing so, significantly limited our ability to tackle the climate crisis. Oligarchs of all kinds had seized power and were using it to maintain the status quo.

Now that we’ve seen Russia launch an oil invasion of Ukraine, it’s a little easier to see this trend in relief – but Putin is far from the only case: America’s deep democratic deficits have long haunted the climate negotiations. The reason we have a system of voluntary commitments, not a binding global agreement, is that the world finally realized that there would never be 66 votes in the US Senate for a real treaty.

And so we found ourselves looking at a world whose people really want to take action on climate change, but whose systems don’t.

Autocrats are often directly the result of fossil fuels. The crucial thing about oil and gas is that it is concentrated in a few places around the world, and therefore the people who control those places end up with huge amounts of unwarranted and inexplicable power.

The sun and the wind are, in these terms, much closer to being democratic: they are available everywhere.

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Typically, territories with the healthiest democracies and least vested interests make the most progress on climate change. Part of the job of climate activists is therefore to work for democratic states that work.

But given the time constraints imposed by physics – the need for quick action – that can’t be the whole strategy. Activists have arguably focused too much on politics and not enough on the other center of power in our civilization: money.

It’s one of the reasons some of us have worked so hard on campaigns like fossil fuel divestment – we’ve won big victories with New York’s pension funds and California’s vast university system. . Now we are doing the same with the huge banks which are the financial lifeline of the industry.

Putin’s farcical war might be where some of these strands come together. It highlights the power that controlling scarce supplies gives to autocrats. It also showed us the power of financial systems to pressure recalcitrant political leaders: Russia is being systematically and effectively punished by banks and corporations. The shock of war could also strengthen the resolve and unity of the remaining democracies around the world.

But we have years, not decades, to get the climate crisis under control. We won’t have moments like this again. The brave people of Ukraine may be fighting for more than they can imagine.

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Tony Danza will take care of the Malverne bar to save a school trip https://muirfieldcommunity.org/tony-danza-will-take-care-of-the-malverne-bar-to-save-a-school-trip/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 18:38:29 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/tony-danza-will-take-care-of-the-malverne-bar-to-save-a-school-trip/ Before Tony Danza became the ‘boss’, he was a bartender at a pub in Malverne, where he grew up. Since then, the 62-year-old actor has taken on a variety of television and film roles, written two books and even served as a public schoolteacher. On March 14, he’ll loop back tending to the same faucets […]]]>

Before Tony Danza became the ‘boss’, he was a bartender at a pub in Malverne, where he grew up. Since then, the 62-year-old actor has taken on a variety of television and film roles, written two books and even served as a public schoolteacher.

On March 14, he’ll loop back tending to the same faucets at Connolly Station (it was called Ickle Bickle’s when he worked there) for a fundraiser to reinstate the Howard T. Herber Middle School.

When Danza, a 1968 Malverne High School graduate, learned from his cousin that the field trip to the Frost Valley YMCA in upstate Claryville was in jeopardy due to budget cuts, he volunteered to help.

“Education is my problem,” said Danza, who taught at a Philadelphia high school in 2009, which was chronicled on the reality show “Teach.” He also wrote the book “I would like to apologize to all the teachers I had”.

“I am worried about the messages we are sending to children,” he added. “We tell them education is really important, but put them in a rundown building or cut programs.”

Danza partnered with the Save Frost Valley Committee, a group made up primarily of Howard T. Herber parents, to pull together the fundraiser.

Since the field trip, a 42-year tradition, was cut from the Malverne School District budget last May, the group has raised $15,000 of the $40,000 needed to reinstate it. Volunteers washed cars, sold candles and hosted a concert featuring the “American Idol” Season 10 contestant and Merrick resident Robbie Rosen.

“SFV is thrilled and grateful that Tony Danza is returning to Malverne to support our mission,” said committee member Gina Genti. “The community is buzzing and we are planning a great evening with lots of memories and good laughs, all for a great cause!”

Danza anticipates a nostalgic night.

“I learned a lot about acting behind that bar,” he said. “I can’t help but reminisce.”

While he’s eager to show off his bartending skills and reconnect with people from his old neighborhood, he mostly said he wants to show the kids that “someone really cares…It’s not just empty words”.

With a minimum donation of $20, each attendee will receive a drink, courtesy of Connolly Station owner Gerry Hughes, served by the “Taxi” and “Who’s the Boss?” ” star. Additional revenue will be raised through the sale of raffle tickets, with prizes including an iPad and a weekend in Frost Valley. The event starts at 7 p.m.

Connolly station is located at 280 Hempstead Ave.

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