Community tend – Muirfield Community http://muirfieldcommunity.org/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 12:56:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-14-70x70.png Community tend – Muirfield Community http://muirfieldcommunity.org/ 32 32 Tend opens its first studio in Nashville https://muirfieldcommunity.org/tend-opens-its-first-studio-in-nashville/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 13:05:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/tend-opens-its-first-studio-in-nashville/ Technology-driven dental company opens its first clinical studio in five points in East of Nashville; supported by head office with 100 team members NASHVILLE, Tenn., September 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Tend, the first dentist people are looking forward to, opened its first studio in Nashville today, adding a fifth clinical market to its growing national […]]]>

Technology-driven dental company opens its first clinical studio in five points in East of Nashville; supported by head office with 100 team members

NASHVILLE, Tenn., September 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Tend, the first dentist people are looking forward to, opened its first studio in Nashville today, adding a fifth clinical market to its growing national presence. The company currently operates 22 locations across washington d.c., Boston, Atlantaand New York Citywhere he opened his first studio in October 2019. Tender East of Nashvillelocated at 962 Woodland Street in the five points neighborhood, will strengthen their presence in Music City, where their headquarters and more than 100 team members are based.

Trending east of Nashville

“Tend’s arrival in Nashville is truly a full-loop moment,” said Doug Hudson, the local co-founder and CEO of Tend. “Over the past three years, our team members here have been building Tend at a rapid pace to meet the rapid growth in demand from our members since our launch. I couldn’t be more proud to launch our outpost ‘natal’ clinic to share our mission with our team members and the community at large, and I am confident that we will be enthusiastically received.”

With a mission to make dentistry a stimulating, caring and joyful experience, Tend has become ubiquitous in major East Coast cities and has grown to serve over 100,000 members. Modern, technology-driven dental studios are popular for their beautiful design, seamless online booking, expert clinicians, wide range of services, and elevated in-person experience through hospitality touchpoints.

His East of Nashville the location will be joined by additional openings in 2023 as the organization continues to expand its full-service dentistry model nationwide and deepen its presence in existing markets like DC and New York City metropolitan areas.

About the trend

Tend is the first dentist people are looking forward to. Launched in October 2019, Tend was created to set a new standard in oral health by providing dentistry the way it should be – hassle-free, personalized and simple, with an emphasis on patient happiness – all in one quiet, inviting and thoughtfully designed space. Founding CEO Doug Hudson is supported by more than 600 talented team members in New York City, Nashville, washington d.c.., Boston and Atlanta. In addition to operating 23 studios along the East Coast, Tend also offers a suite of dentist-designed consumer products to extend its mission into members’ daily lives. For more information, visit hellotend.com or download the Tend Dental app, available on all iOS and Android devices.

Media inquiries
press@hellotend.com

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SOURCE Trend

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Students take care of beach dunes | Noosa today https://muirfieldcommunity.org/students-take-care-of-beach-dunes-noosa-today/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 19:00:07 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/students-take-care-of-beach-dunes-noosa-today/ Grade 11 students from Noosa Pengari Steiner School, along with teacher Peter Dick and PBCA’s Rochelle Gooch, worked hard on maintenance weeding at the Message Post sculpture site before completing additional planting of endemic native tubestock to improve the beach trail at access 59. The Peregian Beach Community Association is confident […]]]>



Grade 11 students from Noosa Pengari Steiner School, along with teacher Peter Dick and PBCA’s Rochelle Gooch, worked hard on maintenance weeding at the Message Post sculpture site before completing additional planting of endemic native tubestock to improve the beach trail at access 59.

The Peregian Beach Community Association is confident the future of our coastal dunes is in good hands after Grade 11 students from Noosa Pengari Steiner School joined them last week for weeding and native planting.

“And it’s not a token effort,” a PBCA spokeswoman said.

“Teacher Peter Dick has long been involved with the PBCA and our bush care guru Rochelle Gooch.

“This is part of their coastal management studies and the student was keen to learn more about the practical processes involved in protecting our dunes and the habitat they support.”

Peter said his students truly understood that the vital dune system was not healthy and resilient by accident.

“It takes knowledge and constant work from community groups like the PBCA,” he said.

“Students will be back to check out the leptospernums and bankia amules they helped plant.”

Les Rochelles and other regular bush carers were thrilled to see this generation personally invested in understanding our coastal ecosystem.






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MIT researchers say autism studies tend to exclude women https://muirfieldcommunity.org/mit-researchers-say-autism-studies-tend-to-exclude-women/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 06:10:24 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/mit-researchers-say-autism-studies-tend-to-exclude-women/ Most autism studies consistently recruit small numbers of female subjects or exclude them altogether, according to a new study from MIT. A commonly used screening test creates a gender gap that can hinder the diagnosis and treatment of autism in women and girls. Researchers studying autism have worked to include more women and girls in […]]]>

Most autism studies consistently recruit small numbers of female subjects or exclude them altogether, according to a new study from MIT.

A commonly used screening test creates a gender gap that can hinder the diagnosis and treatment of autism in women and girls.

Researchers studying autism have worked to include more women and girls in their studies in recent years. However, despite these efforts, a new study by MIT finds that most autism studies consistently recruit a small number of female subjects or exclude them altogether.

According to the research findings, a screening test commonly used to determine eligibility for autism studies consistently screens out a much higher percentage of women than men. This creates a “leaky pipeline” that results in a severe underrepresentation of women in autism studies.

“We were really surprised at how many men we retained and how many women we lost to ADOS.” — Anila D’Mello

This lack of representation makes it harder to develop useful interventions or provide accurate diagnoses for girls and women, researchers say.

“I think the results promote a more inclusive approach and a broadening of the lens to end up being less biased in terms of research participation,” says John Gabrieli. He is the Grover Hermann Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. “The more we understand about autism in males and females and non-binary individuals, the better the services and more accurate diagnoses we can provide.”

Gabrieli, who is also a fellow at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, is the lead author of the study, which was recently published in the journal autism research. Anila D’Mello is the lead author of the article. She is a former MIT postdoctoral researcher who is now an assistant professor at the University of Texas Southwestern. MIT Technical Associate Isabelle Frosch, Research Coordinator Cindy Li, and Research Specialist Annie Cardinaux are also the authors of the paper.

Autism studies tend to exclude women

A new study from MIT shows that autism studies tend to exclude women. Credit: José-Luis-Olivares, MIT

Eliminate females

Autism spectrum disorders are usually diagnosed based on the observation of traits such as repetitive behaviors and difficulties with language and social interaction. Although doctors can use a variety of screening tests to help them make a diagnosis, these tests are not mandatory.

For autism research studies, it is common to use a screening test called the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) to determine study eligibility. This test, which assesses social interaction, repetitive behaviors, communication and play, provides a quantitative score in each category, and only participants who reach certain scores are eligible to be included in the studies.

In a study exploring how quickly the brains of autistic adults adapt to new events in the environment, scientists in Gabrieli’s lab began to notice that ADOS seemed to have unequal effects on the participation of children. men and women looking. As the study progressed, D’Mello noticed significant brain differences between the male and female study subjects.

To dig deeper into these differences, D’Mello tried to find more female participants using an MIT database of autistic adults who expressed interest in participating in research studies. However, when she sorted the subjects, she found that only about half of the women in the database met the ADOS cut-off scores typically required for inclusion in autism studies, compared to 80% of the men.

“We then realized that there was a gap and that ADOS was essentially weeding out those who ended up participating in the research,” says D’Mello. “We were really surprised at how many men we retained and how many women we lost to ADOS.”

To see if this phenomenon was more widespread, the scientists looked at six publicly available datasets, which include more than 40,000 adults diagnosed with autism. For some of these datasets, participants were screened with ADOS to determine their eligibility to participate in the studies. However, for others, a “community diagnosis” – diagnosis from a physician or other health care provider – was sufficient.

The researchers found that in datasets that required ADOS screening for eligibility, the male-to-female ratio was around 8:1, while in those that only required community diagnosis, the ratios varied d about 2:1 to 1:1.

Previous studies have found differences between behavioral patterns in autistic men and women, but the ADOS test was originally developed using a predominantly male sample, which may explain why it often excludes women from research studies. explains D’Mello.

“There were few females in the sample that was used to create this assessment, so it may not be very good at detecting the female phenotype, which may differ in some respects, mainly in areas like social communication,” she says.

Effects of exclusion

Failure to include more women and girls in autism studies may contribute to gaps in definitions of the disorder, researchers say.

“The way we think about it is that the field may have developed an implicit bias in how autism is defined, and it’s been disproportionately driven by male analysis and male recruitment, and so on,” says Gabrieli. “So the definition doesn’t fit as well, on average, with the different expression of autism that seems to be more common in women.”

This implicit bias has led to documented difficulties in receiving a diagnosis for girls and women, even when their symptoms are the same as those exhibited by autistic boys and men.

“A lot of women could be completely missed in terms of diagnoses, and then our study shows that in the research setting, what’s already a small pelvis shrinks at a much higher rate than men,” says D’Mello. .

Excluding girls and women from this type of research study can lead to treatments that don’t work as well for them. It also contributes to the perception that autism does not affect women as much as men.

“The goal is for research to directly inform treatment, therapies and public perception,” D’Mello says. “If the research indicates that there are no women with autism, or that the brain basis of autism only resembles established patterns in men, then you’re not really helping women as much. than you might be, and you’re not really understanding the truth about what the disorder might be.

The researchers now plan to further explore some of the gender and sex-based differences that appear in autism, and how they arise. They also plan to expand the gender categories they include. In the current study, the surveys each participant completed asked them to choose male or female, but the researchers updated their questionnaire to include non-binary and transgender options.

Reference: “Exclusion of Women in Autism Research: Empirical Evidence from a ‘Leaky’ Research Recruitment Pipeline” by Anila M. D’Mello, Isabelle R. Frosch, Cindy E. Li, Annie L. Cardinals and John DE Gabrieli, August 22, 2022, autism research.
DOI: 10.1002/aur.2795

The research was funded by the Hock E. Tan and K. Lisa Yang Center for Autism Research, the Simons Center for the Social Brain at MIT, and the National Institutes of Mental Health.

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“I don’t tend to think of things in terms of brand – I just try to make useful tools for people” – Grindle of LIFE IS UNFAIR Audio Devices on designing unique guitar pedals and working with Devi Ever Tours | Guitare.com https://muirfieldcommunity.org/i-dont-tend-to-think-of-things-in-terms-of-brand-i-just-try-to-make-useful-tools-for-people-grindle-of-life-is-unfair-audio-devices-on-designing-unique-guitar-pedals-and-working-with-devi-ever/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:00:37 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/i-dont-tend-to-think-of-things-in-terms-of-brand-i-just-try-to-make-useful-tools-for-people-grindle-of-life-is-unfair-audio-devices-on-designing-unique-guitar-pedals-and-working-with-devi-ever/ What inspired you to tinker and build effects pedals? “I started building pedals during summer vacation after my freshman year of college when a friend asked if I could put together a kit for an overdrive pedal due to my limited experience in the replacing jacks on guitars and after looking into it I realized […]]]>

What inspired you to tinker and build effects pedals?

“I started building pedals during summer vacation after my freshman year of college when a friend asked if I could put together a kit for an overdrive pedal due to my limited experience in the replacing jacks on guitars and after looking into it I realized I could build a bunch of rare and/or expensive fuzzes to try so I was hooked!I then went on to do my latest college project on modified fuzz boxes and started LIFE IS UNFAIR Audio Devices after toying with a few circuit ideas and working on some soul destroying work for a few years.

Your pedals are inspired by modular synths and vintage fuzz. Where do you draw these influences from and how do they inspire your constructions?

“I wanted to get my hands on a Big Muff after hearing 24 Hour Revenge Therapy by Jawbreaker and learning that was what was used on the guitars and modular stuff I got myself into years after being transfixed by the Buchla Concerts by Suzanne Ciani. In terms of design, it’s usually about building something I’d like to use myself, like The Dream Left Behind which I designed because I wanted a Big Muff style circuit that would react to the control setting of the volume in the same way as a Fuzz Face circuit.

You’ve also collaborated with other stellar manufacturers like Triungulo Lab and created limited runs for zines like Ladyfuzz. How does this community impact the brand?

LIFE IS UNFAIR Pineal Gland

“I love working with other people because it means I can work on a lot of things that I wouldn’t have the chance to do on my own and learn from other really talented artists and designers. Of course, cross-pollinating our audiences is great too, as they share all of our work with a wider range of people!”

What other collaborations do you have on the horizon?

Holy Island Audio Rorschach

“I have a few projects going on, but nothing I can talk about in depth at the moment, unfortunately. We should soon announce the first collaborative effort between me and the Pedal Partners YouTube channel! »

“On top of that, I also worked as part of a team designing a really fun new instrument for Dubreq after doing the PCB for their recent Stylophone S-1 synth re-analysis. In the future there will undoubtedly be more joint efforts with Holy Island Audio, who worked with me on the dual Rorschach filter/fuzz and also screen printed all my speakers, as well as the relatively new lineup from Cardiff, Teaching Machines, the first of which offers the Wellspring stereo reverb/delay/filter unit for which I designed the circuit board.

You recently renamed the Devi Ever: Cymru, which was also cult. Why did you choose to update the company profile?

Cases Shoegazer Devi Ever Cymru

“The Devi Ever: Cymru project that I started alongside LIFE IS UNFAIR when Izzi, who started Devi Ever: FX, offered the opportunity to license their circuitry and artwork in early 2019. As a huge fan of the original Devi Ever units, I jumped at the chance and am super grateful to have had the chance to build my version of classics like the Shoegazer.Although I no longer work full time on Devi Ever : Cymru, there may be a few limited runs down the line, and if there are DIY enthusiasts looking to build some of the circuits themselves, there are official maps available in the Devi Ever store :FX on Reverb.com.

Did you have any external investments at the start?

“I borrowed a small amount of money from my grandfather to cover my rent for three months while I left my day job to work on LIFE IS UNFAIR to see if it was viable, but other than that , it was just about spending any profit on developing new things.

When did you feel like you nailed your brand image?

“I don’t tend to think of things in terms of branding – I just try to create useful tools for people to make music, with artwork that I think is cool!”

LIFE IS UNFAIR The dream left behind

With new products to come and a recently relaunched brand, what’s next for Life Is Unfair Audio?

“The next couple of months are going to be pretty hectic as my band Live, Do Nothing are busy booking gigs to showcase our new record Hiraeth & Loathing which will be released by the lovely folks at Specialist Subject Records on September 23rd so that’s hard to say exactly when LIFE IS UNFAIR’s next product will be, however I’ve been working on a few non-effects designs, the first of which to be released will be a new dual CV and expression controller that I’m super excited to show the world because I think it will open up some fun new options for controlling effects and synths.

To find out more and ride, go to lifeisunfair.co.uk. Follow them on Instagram at @lifeisunfairaudio.

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6 Steps to Build Patient Confidence in Telehealth https://muirfieldcommunity.org/6-steps-to-build-patient-confidence-in-telehealth/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 13:08:24 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/6-steps-to-build-patient-confidence-in-telehealth/ With Covid-19 came a flood of new telehealth (virtual consultation) health solutions, exposing more patients to its benefits and features. More publicity, more awareness, and more conversation have brought telehealth to a wider audience, and that can only be good for everyone. The question remains, however, how do you create that confidence in telehealth for […]]]>

With Covid-19 came a flood of new telehealth (virtual consultation) health solutions, exposing more patients to its benefits and features. More publicity, more awareness, and more conversation have brought telehealth to a wider audience, and that can only be good for everyone. The question remains, however, how do you create that confidence in telehealth for a patient, so that they turn to it the next time they need healthcare?

Possible candidates for understanding the dynamics could include different patient demographics or the fact that the proposed solution is easier to navigate in one practice than another. The following are recommendations and tips for general healthcare providers looking to incorporate formalized telehealth into their practices.

1. Be the one to present the benefits of telehealth and start the conversation

I was in conversation with a provider and asked: how did you get telehealth so well, so quickly? He said, I tell my patients they’re crazy if they don’t use it. He talks to them about it in his rooms and makes it part of his consultation. He emphasizes the benefits of telehealth to the patient such as the convenience factor, saving time and money by not having to drive to their room. He mentions that he can usually extend same-day care, while charging less for it, and often gives a free consultation for using his solution. He also notices that his patients, while generally aware of telehealth as a solution, only begin to trust the service once he introduces the subject.

2. Market your service

The problem with telehealth is letting patients know that healthcare providers are actually offering it. It’s potentially quite time-consuming and I often see a provider give up after about a month, saying their patients weren’t interested. Most of the time they didn’t even know they could use it.

However, these same patients continue to use WhatsApp and email – forms of telehealth although not necessarily secure.

It’s not uncommon for practices to have a pager they’ve designed with the benefits for their patients, how to use it, and it’s a great place to include consultation pricing. Patients like to have something tangible. Placing information on Facebook, LinkedIn and municipal circulars is also common practice. A very effective idea that I have seen in practice is a fridge magnet containing the vital information about the telehealth solution. The patient could attach it to their refrigerator door, not only was it convenient, but it also served as a constant reminder that the health care provider was offering such a service in the first place.

3. Speak frankly

This was great advice for providers….stay away from telehealth jargon, like “virtual care”. Instead, stick to more familiar phrases such as “online date.” The idea is fairly new as it stands. Be confusing and off-putting Make it easy to talk to the patient, so as not to leave them confused and suspicious of what, to many, is cutting-edge technology and ideas.

4. Make questions easy

Including the mention of telehealth in the conversation is one thing, but then you need to encourage your patients to ask questions, so you and your staff need to have the answers at the ready. Providers also put equipment in their rooms, inviting their patients to approach their staff about telehealth. When patients have the ability to ask questions about telehealth, especially with their trusted provider, they will feel much more comfortable. Make sure the telehealth solution you choose can offer some kind of information sharing or training to staff members.

5. Practical demonstration – show and tell

I love the idea of ​​demonstrating your solution to your staff (and even your patients). It shows that practice is involved. You can do a mock consultation with one of your reception assistants and show how simple and effective a consultation can be. You are able to show them that it works. There is no better person to demonstrate than you and the more you practice, the more confident you will become.

6. Tools of the telehealth trade

I’ve seen a telehealth initiative fail because patients felt like they needed a desktop or high-end smartphone to access the solution. Reassure your patient that he probably has all the tools he needs and it probably won’t require any expense on his part. Make sure your patients know what they need and it probably won’t require any extra expense on their part. Chances are they already have everything they need. This often feels complex and requires additional equipment. Demonstrating how easy it is will set the record straight.

In answering the question of why one practice has a thriving telehealth initiative and another does not, provider intervention and participation play an important role in success. Installing a new solution, sitting back and waiting to see what happens, is doomed to failure. Like any good idea, you need to tell people about it. The secret is to put yourself in the patient’s shoes. When you analyze a new solution, think about it from their point of view. Once you’ve instilled patient confidence in your telehealth solution, you’ll wonder what you did without it.

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Why young adults in minority communities tend to start out with lower credit scores – NBC 6 South Florida https://muirfieldcommunity.org/why-young-adults-in-minority-communities-tend-to-start-out-with-lower-credit-scores-nbc-6-south-florida/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 12:34:02 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/why-young-adults-in-minority-communities-tend-to-start-out-with-lower-credit-scores-nbc-6-south-florida/ Young adults from predominantly black and Hispanic communities tend to have lower credit scores than those residing in predominantly white communities, according to a new study from the Urban Institute. Young adults from predominantly Black and Hispanic communities are also more likely to see their credit rating decline as they age. These factors can make […]]]>
  • Young adults from predominantly black and Hispanic communities tend to have lower credit scores than those residing in predominantly white communities, according to a new study from the Urban Institute.
  • Young adults from predominantly Black and Hispanic communities are also more likely to see their credit rating decline as they age.
  • These factors can make these borrowers vulnerable to cycles of debt, an expert said.

According to a new study from the Urban Institute, young adults from majority black and Hispanic communities tend to have lower average credit scores than those residing in majority white communities.

The research found that 25- to 29-year-olds in majority-Black communities have a median credit score of 582 — below the subprime threshold of 600. In comparison, 25-to-29-year-olds in majority-Hispanic communities had a score of median credit. of 644, while those in majority white communities had a median score of 687.

Additionally, young adults from predominantly Black and Hispanic communities are also more likely to see their credit rating decline as they age, according to the nonprofit research organization.

Between 2010 and 2021, 32.9% of 18-29 year olds in majority black communities saw their credit score drop, while 26.2% of those in majority Hispanic and 21% of those in majority white communities saw their credit score drop. credit decline.

The research is based on the Urban Institute’s analysis of consumer records from one of the three major credit bureaus. The precise source of the data was not disclosed.

Bad scores ‘can lead to cycles of debt’

These low scores have significant and lasting financial consequences.

“People with credit scores below that [600] are less likely to get credit at affordable rates,” said Thea Garon, senior policy program manager at the Urban Institute.

“They are more likely to borrow high-cost credit, which can lead to cycles of debt and further erode their credit ratings,” she said.

Subprime lending options tend to be more visible in diverse underserved communities, noted Bruce McClary, senior vice president of memberships and communications at the National Foundation for Credit Counseling.

Residents of these areas who have income problems and do not have much job stability may turn to subprime financing with higher interest rates and high fees, which can hurt their credit score. “It’s kind of a recipe for disaster,” McClary said.

One such high-interest product, the payday loan, has recently come under scrutiny for the cycles of high fees and debt associated with it.

Score disparity stems from discriminatory policies

Credit scores measure the likelihood of a borrower repaying their debt on time. Most credit scores range from 300 to 850. The higher the score, the better the interest rate a borrower can get on credit cards, as well as mortgages, autos and other loans.

Credit scores are determined by factors such as a borrower’s current outstanding debts, number and type of loans they have, length of time loans are open and available, bill payment history and the amount of credit used.

The reason black and Hispanic borrowers start behind on their credit scores has less to do with individual behavior and more with the limited financial resources of their family household, Garon said.

These households have less wealth to draw on from previous generations because of lending policies that favored white borrowers, such as property covenants that prevented blacks from living in majority white areas, and redlining, whereby mortgage lenders restricted the customers they served.

“The disparities are rooted in decades of discriminatory policies that have systematically denied communities of color equal access to affordable financial services as well as opportunities to pass on wealth to future generations,” Garon said.

Getty Images

Closing the gap requires policy changes

For people who are trapped in a cycle of high-cost credit borrowing, counselors or nonprofits can help, Garon said. Credit unions can also be a resource for consolidating loans at lower interest rates, making it easier to pay down debt balances.

Importantly, because credit scores are based on how well a person is honoring their financial obligations, they don’t necessarily need more ways to get their rating up.

“You can start small and still build a pretty decent credit score if you need to rebuild your credit or improve your credit to get to where you’re able to qualify for lower interest rates and loans that meet your needs,” McClary said.

But for the system to really change, policymakers will need to address the problem with proactive measures to ensure that lenders of all kinds make loans fairly and that the credit scoring system gives all borrowers a fighting chance. get affordable credit, Garon said.

Learn more about personal finance:
Mortgage rejection rate for black people twice that of general population: Report
These bank charges could strain your budget
New guaranteed income experiments are happening across the country

If rent payments were included in credit scores, for example, it might better reflect people’s ability to pay their obligations, she said.

Additionally, other policies could close the racial wealth gap, such as universal baby bonds, progressive childhood development accounts, tuition-free public universities, as well as student aid. buying a first home, Garon said.

Bank of America recently announced the launch of new mortgage products with no down payment and no closing costs for certain markets, including majority black and/or Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods in Charlotte, NC; Dallas; Detroit; Los Angeles; and Miami. Other financial institutions, including Citi, also offer programs to make their lending practices more inclusive.

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Autism Studies Tend to Exclude Women, Researchers Say | MIT News https://muirfieldcommunity.org/autism-studies-tend-to-exclude-women-researchers-say-mit-news/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/autism-studies-tend-to-exclude-women-researchers-say-mit-news/ In recent years, researchers studying autism have worked to include more women and girls in their studies. However, despite these efforts, most autism studies consistently recruit small numbers of female subjects or exclude them altogether, according to a new study from MIT. Researchers have found that a screening test commonly used to determine eligibility for […]]]>

In recent years, researchers studying autism have worked to include more women and girls in their studies. However, despite these efforts, most autism studies consistently recruit small numbers of female subjects or exclude them altogether, according to a new study from MIT.

Researchers have found that a screening test commonly used to determine eligibility for autism studies consistently screens out a much higher percentage of women than men, creating a “leaky pipeline” that results in severe under-reporting. representation of women in autism studies.

This lack of representation makes it harder to develop useful interventions or provide accurate diagnoses for girls and women, researchers say.

“I think the results support a more inclusive approach and a broadening of purpose to end up being less biased in terms of research participation,” says John Gabrieli, Grover Hermann Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Professor of brain and cognitive. science at MIT. “The more we understand about autism in males and females and non-binary individuals, the better the services and more accurate diagnoses we can provide.”

Gabrieli, who is also a fellow at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, is lead author of the study, which appears in the journal autism research. Anila D’Mello, a former MIT postdoc who is now an assistant professor at the University of Texas Southwestern, is the lead author of the paper. MIT Technical Associate Isabelle Frosch, Research Coordinator Cindy Li, and Research Specialist Annie Cardinaux are also the authors of the paper.

Eliminate females

Autism spectrum disorders are diagnosed based on observation of traits such as repetitive behaviors and difficulties with language and social interaction. Doctors can use a variety of screening tests to help them make a diagnosis, but these tests are not required.

For autism research studies, it is common to use a screening test called the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) to determine study eligibility. This test, which assesses social interaction, communication, play and repetitive behaviors, provides a quantitative score in each category, and only participants who reach certain scores are eligible to be included in the studies.

In a study exploring how quickly the brains of autistic adults adapt to new events in the environment, scientists in Gabrieli’s lab began to notice that ADOS seemed to have unequal effects on the participation of children. men and women looking. As the study progressed, D’Mello noticed significant brain differences between the male and female study subjects.

To dig deeper into these differences, D’Mello tried to find more female participants using an MIT database of autistic adults who expressed interest in participating in research studies. However, when she sorted the subjects, she found that only about half of the women in the database met the ADOS cut-off scores typically required for inclusion in autism studies, compared to 80% of the men.

“We then realized that there was a gap and that ADOS was essentially weeding out those who ended up participating in the research,” says D’Mello. “We were really surprised at how many men we retained and how many women we lost to ADOS.”

To see if this phenomenon was more widespread, the researchers looked at six publicly available datasets, which include more than 40,000 adults diagnosed with autism. For some of these datasets, participants were screened with ADOS to determine their eligibility to participate in the studies, while for others a “community diagnosis” – diagnosis from a physician or other healthcare provider of health – was enough.

The researchers found that in datasets that required ADOS screening for eligibility, the male-to-female ratio was around 8:1, while in those that only required community diagnosis, the ratios varied d about 2:1 to 1:1.

Previous studies have found differences between behavioral patterns in autistic men and women, but the ADOS test was originally developed using a predominantly male sample, which may explain why it often excludes women from studies. research, says D’Mello.

“There were few females in the sample that was used to create this assessment, so it may not be very good at detecting the female phenotype, which may differ in some respects, mainly in areas like social communication,” she says.

Effects of exclusion

Failure to include more women and girls in autism studies may contribute to gaps in definitions of the disorder, researchers say.

“The way we think about it is that the field may have developed an implicit bias in how autism is defined, and it’s been disproportionately driven by male analysis and male recruitment, etc. .”, explains Gabrieli. “So the definition doesn’t fit as well, on average, with the different expression of autism that seems to be more common in women.”

This implicit bias has led to documented difficulties in receiving a diagnosis for girls and women, even when their symptoms are the same as those exhibited by autistic boys and men.

“A lot of women could be completely overlooked in terms of diagnoses, and then our study shows that in research, what’s already a small pelvis shrinks at a much higher rate than men do,” says D’Mello. .

Excluding girls and women from this type of research study may lead to treatments not working as well for them, and it contributes to the perception that autism does not affect women as much as men.

“The goal is for research to directly inform treatment, therapies and public perception,” D’Mello says. “If research indicates that there are no women with autism, or that the brain basis of autism only resembles established patterns in men, then you’re not really helping women as much. than you might be, and you’re not really understanding the truth about what the disorder might be.

The researchers now plan to further explore some of the gender and sex-based differences that appear in autism, and how they arise. They also plan to expand the gender categories they include. In the current study, the surveys each participant completed asked them to choose male or female, but the researchers updated their questionnaire to include non-binary and transgender options.

The research was funded by the Hock E. Tan and K. Lisa Yang Center for Autism Research, the Simons Center for the Social Brain at MIT, and the National Institutes of Mental Health.

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Eating disorder symptoms tend to be less severe in people with strong family identification https://muirfieldcommunity.org/eating-disorder-symptoms-tend-to-be-less-severe-in-people-with-strong-family-identification/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 17:08:32 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/eating-disorder-symptoms-tend-to-be-less-severe-in-people-with-strong-family-identification/ Eating disorders are a very common and often fatal form of mental illness. Having a strong support system can help alleviate some of the difficulties and symptoms associated with these mental illnesses. A study published in the Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology suggests that family relationships, particularly strong identification with one’s own family, […]]]>

Eating disorders are a very common and often fatal form of mental illness. Having a strong support system can help alleviate some of the difficulties and symptoms associated with these mental illnesses. A study published in the Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology suggests that family relationships, particularly strong identification with one’s own family, may be linked to fewer and less severe eating disorder symptoms.

Eating disorders and loneliness have a strong, two-way relationship, in which loneliness worsens eating disorder symptomatology and having an eating disorder worsens feelings of isolation and loneliness . Previous research has established the importance of social connectedness for people with eating disorders, but more specific questions have remained unanswered. This study aims to better understand the role of family relationships for people with eating disorders and the mechanisms underlying the relationship.

Niamh McNamara and her colleagues conducted two studies, one where data was collected before COVID and the other during the early stages of the pandemic. Study 1 used 82 participants between the ages of 18 and 62, 80% of whom had been officially diagnosed with an eating disorder. They completed measures on family identification, loneliness, severity of erectile dysfunction symptoms, and demographics.

Study 2 used 234 participants from the United States, United Kingdom and Ireland recruited over the Internet. 67% of participants said they had been diagnosed with an eating disorder. Study 2 participants completed measures of anxiety, eating disorder symptom severity, eating disorder-related impact of COVID-19, and demographics.

Results from both studies showed that family identification was linked to significantly lower levels of eating disorder symptoms. Additionally, participants with higher family identification showed lower levels of anxiety and reported fewer impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The findings support the idea that families are an important social recovery resource for people with eating disorders and help us understand why increased connection during the COVID-19 pandemic may have benefited them,” said McNamara, associate professor of social psychology at Nottingham Trent. University, in a press release.

“This suggests that families should be viewed as an important social recovery resource and should be included in the treatment of adult eating disorders, including family interventions that target repair or construction of identification. family and a collaborative approach to combat loneliness.”

Mediation analyzes suggest that family identification may help reduce symptom severity through the mechanism of reducing the loneliness of the person with the eating disorder. This implies that strong family ties can be an important protective factor against eating disorders.

“In our studies, we found that family identification was associated with reductions in the severity of eating disorder symptoms in general, as well as anxiety during the early stages of the pandemic. COVID-19,” added co-author Juliet Wakefield, senior lecturer at Nottingham Trent University. “This was due to the decrease in loneliness which, in the second study, predicted a reduction in fears of the eating disorder-related impact of social distancing measures.”

This study has provided insight into the mechanisms by which family relationships can alleviate the symptoms of eating disorders. Despite this, there are limitations to note. One such limitation is that no definitive causal relationship can be drawn from the cross-sectional data used in this study. Additionally, both studies focused primarily on white, cisgender women. Future research could focus on obtaining a more diverse sample.

The study, “The link between family identification, loneliness and symptom severity in people with eating disorders,” was authored by Niamh McNamara, Juliet RH Wakefield, Tegan Cruwys, Adam Potter, Bethany A. Jones and Sara McDevitt.

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Mariupol refugees from the Russian war take care of their own in Odessa https://muirfieldcommunity.org/mariupol-refugees-from-the-russian-war-take-care-of-their-own-in-odessa/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/mariupol-refugees-from-the-russian-war-take-care-of-their-own-in-odessa/ ODESA, Ukraine – The staff of the ‘Me Mariupol’ refugee center know what it’s like for the survivors of one of the cities most devastated by Russia’s assault on Ukraine – they’re all from there too . “The main thing is not just to provide practical assistance and help, such as groceries, but to help […]]]>

ODESA, Ukraine – The staff of the ‘Me Mariupol’ refugee center know what it’s like for the survivors of one of the cities most devastated by Russia’s assault on Ukraine – they’re all from there too .

“The main thing is not just to provide practical assistance and help, such as groceries, but to help Mariupol feel comfortable in Odessa, to connect with them as former neighbors and to show them around and make them feel at home,” said Serhii Marchuk, the chef. center and himself an internally displaced person (IDP) from Mariupol.

Marchuk, 40, evacuated from Mariupol in April, traveled through Russia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, then returned to Ukraine, traveling with his wife and two children, aged 8 and 3.

It took nine days and 5,000 kilometres, he told The Hill through an interpreter last week.

Children are afraid of thunderstorms, he says – it reminds them of the bombing.

In his previous life, he worked in Mariupol under the mayor, Vadym Boychenko, and his current position as head of the Odessa center is an extension of that work.

Dispersed in their own country

The center, one of 11 across Ukraine that hosts and employs almost exclusively IDPs from Mariupol, opened about a month ago.

Marchuk said he chose to settle in Odessa because its position along the Black Sea reminded him of his hometown, which is on the coast of the Sea of ​​Azov.

The Odessa center, an initiative of Boychenko, according to Marchuk, is housed in what was once a school.

NGOs and aid agencies that help support it are listed on a notice board at the entrance – including the Ukrainian government, Save the Children, World Central Kitchen, the Danish Refugee Council and local businesses from Odessa.

The building is clean and bright, sparsely decorated with a poster explaining the admissions process to the center, including registration, medical exams and psychological evaluations, short-term childcare, and help finding a home. housing, employment, groceries and other household items.

Marchuk said he managed to register around 1,700 refugees from Mariupol, including 300 children under the age of 18. He estimates that there are around 6,000 more refugees in the city of Odessa and another 3,500 in the greater region.

A Russian soldier walks past the damaged Metallurgical Combine Azovstal factory in Mariupol, Ukraine. Thousands of refugees from the besieged city have made relatively peaceful Odessa their home. (AP picture)

Sambina, a woman from Mariupol who arrived at the center on Thursday and gave only her first name, said she saw it advertised on a Telegram channel. She called the center relief, saying it provided assistance so she could find longer-term accommodation for her family, including her husband, her husband’s brother and seven children aged between 3 and 13. .

“The bottom line is that we need help buying or renting a property,” Sambina says through a translator. “Everything else we can do on our own.”

“Children are the most important thing in my life,” she adds, emphasizing the need to find stable housing.

She left Mariupol in March after spending two weeks in a basement shelter to survive the Russian onslaught.

“We were very scared. The most important thing was to save the children. We saw a lot of deaths,” Sambina said.

Facing a new reality

Marchuk said the biggest problem they face is people who haven’t yet faced the reality that they have to start their lives over.

“The biggest psychological problem is that they are still living there,” he said. “They are distraught, they have lost their property, their jobs, their savings and their families. In this centre, we want to help them start over, but it’s hard for these people.

The center hall displays “Before and After” images of Mariupol that show the city as it is now, completely destroyed by the Russian siege, and images showing a hopeful future of rebuilding it if Ukrainian forces succeed. to end the occupation of the city.

“When the center opened, people came here and they started crying when they saw these pictures because it hurt them so much,” Marchuk said, adding that “everyone who comes from Mariupol understands the name of our problem…. His name is [Russian President Vladimir] Cheese fries ; he is diabolical and he causes us a lot of trouble.

Still, Marchuk said people were optimistic.

“Everyone still believes that victory will be on our side and they will return to Mariupol, rebuild it and make it Ukrainian.”

In the meantime, he hopes the center, which is currently funded until December, can provide a sense of community to the displaced.

“The first and most important thing, when people from Mariupol come here, they feel normal. Because they see people who are also from Mariupol. They lived in the same city, they shopped in the same places – they can understand each other, they speak one language,” he said.

“Sometimes people come here, and they don’t even need anything, they just come here, maybe just looking for a connection, a community. A woman, she came here and she sat there for over an hour. I came over and asked her, ‘Maybe I can help you, do you need anything?’ And she said, “No, I’m just waiting – maybe somebody I know will come here.”

Laura Kelly of The Hill is on assignment in Ukraine.

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Percentage changes in CRM mortality tend to be worse for females, some exceptions exist https://muirfieldcommunity.org/percentage-changes-in-crm-mortality-tend-to-be-worse-for-females-some-exceptions-exist/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/percentage-changes-in-crm-mortality-tend-to-be-worse-for-females-some-exceptions-exist/ August 23, 2022 2 minute read Source/Disclosures Published by: Disclosures: Hockham does not report any relevant financial information. ADD A SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS Receive an email when new articles are published on Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . ” data-action=subscribe> Subscribe We have not […]]]>

August 23, 2022

2 minute read

Source/Disclosures

Disclosures:
Hockham does not report any relevant financial information.


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Although the percentage changes in age-standardized chronic kidney disease are worse for women in 66% of the countries included in this study, there are exceptions in which men experience a less favorable course.

“While the introduction of CRI staging in 2002 reinvigorated research, much remains unknown about sex (and gender) differences in CRI epidemiology and outcomes,” Carinna Hockham, DPhil, from the George Institute for Global Health at Imperial College London, and colleagues wrote. “For example, it is unclear whether changes in age-standardized CKD mortality rates over time, or lack thereof, have been the same in women and men.”

Infographic showing the percentage of countries with increased CKD death rates for both sexes between 1980 and 2019.
Between 1980 and 2019, there was no change in global age-standardized mortality, regardless of sex, and female mortality remained 30% lower than male mortality. Data are from Hockham C, et al. Kidney Med. 2022;doi:10.1016/j.xkme.2022.100535.

In an observational epidemiological study, researchers used data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study to determine how gender differences in CKD mortality vary over time. GBD study investigators collected data on chronic kidney disease deaths from vital records, verbal autopsies and surveillance system data between 1980 and 2017.

Using gender as the exposure, the researchers sought to measure mortality rates associated with CKD per 100,000 population.

The researchers compared the evolution of CRD mortality between sexes in the world and for the 50 most populous countries. However, in 2019 alone, researchers also compared gender differences in age-standardized and age-standardized mortality between countries.

The researchers used Poisson regression models to determine whether the relationship between age and overall chronic kidney disease mortality was affected by gender.

Between 1980 and 2019, there was no change in global age-standardized mortality, regardless of sex, and female mortality remained 30% lower than male mortality. In addition, 36% of the countries included in the analysis showed increased mortality rates from CKD in both sexes. Similarly, changes in CKD mortality rates were worse for women in 66% of countries, with the greatest disparities in change occurring in Egypt, Thailand and Malaysia.

The largest overall percentage increase occurred in Mexico, with a smaller change among women (81% vs. 138%). Female mortality varied between 47% lower and 60% higher than male mortality, in Angola and Egypt, respectively.

“Although female mortality was lower than male mortality in most countries in 2019, three of the five countries with the highest CKD-associated mortality rate had higher female rates (Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan and Egypt). These findings reiterate the need for country-level assessments of gender differences in CRI burden and outcomes to ensure that gender-sensitive and locally relevant approaches to HIV prevention and care IRC can be developed,” wrote Hockham and his colleagues.

They added: “Furthermore, we were only able to examine sex differences in mortality for CKD at all stages. However, there is some evidence that gender differences are attenuated or reversed in patients at later stages, particularly those receiving kidney replacement therapy. Mortality is also only one measure of disease burden; a global assessment of gender differences in disability-adjusted life years is also warranted to understand whether women live longer years with the disease.

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