Community centers – Muirfield Community http://muirfieldcommunity.org/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 12:36:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-14-70x70.png Community centers – Muirfield Community http://muirfieldcommunity.org/ 32 32 Walnut Creek City Council Decides Locations for New Swimming and Community Centers | News https://muirfieldcommunity.org/walnut-creek-city-council-decides-locations-for-new-swimming-and-community-centers-news/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 01:33:15 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/walnut-creek-city-council-decides-locations-for-new-swimming-and-community-centers-news/ “It’s going to impact the same generations who have been so affected by COVID, and I don’t want to take anything else away from them at this point,” Darling said. Council member Kevin Wilk said the current swim center site could accommodate more convenient parking and promote better circulation in the area. Plus, he said, […]]]>

“It’s going to impact the same generations who have been so affected by COVID, and I don’t want to take anything else away from them at this point,” Darling said.

Council member Kevin Wilk said the current swim center site could accommodate more convenient parking and promote better circulation in the area. Plus, he said, it would be a great site for another activity coveted by the city.

“We’ve been talking about pétanque for how many years? Wilk asked. “It would actually be a perfect place to play pétanque.”

The only downside to the current community center site listed in the staff report is that it will require a new utility installation and will require more excavation for the new pools.

The council’s decision on Tuesday was only conceptual. The third option was to build the facilities in the grassy area between the pond and the playground, which would impact the existing parking lot and picnic area and interfere with existing walkways.

The project is now up to city staff to produce two design options for the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Commission to review and then send to council for further comment. The environmental review would also come later.

Just like the financing. The city will work with the Walnut Creek Aquatic Association to raise funds for the construction of a 50 or 25 meter swimming pool. There will also probably be a smaller pool for beginners.

A city report earlier this year said the future Heather Farm community center will cost between $ 20.59 and $ 25.17 million. A future Clarke Memorial Swim Center would cost between $ 16.6 and $ 26.42 million, depending on the size of the pools.

The board will eventually review funding options, including fees on new developments, grants, community donations, user fee increases, rental income obligations, public-private partnerships, and tax increases. general or special. The report recommended that the city conduct community outreach activities on the potential funding.

This part of the Heather Farm project is the first phase of the city plan Your Parks, Your Future, initiated in 2018 and delayed by the pandemic. Civic Park and Shadelands Art Center are also on the list of facilities for improvement. All were built in the late 1960s and 1970s and have been identified as nearing the end of their lifespan.

The city also plans to design a 10 to 15 year master plan for Heather Farm.


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Travis County Community Centers Run Out of Free COVID-19 Home Test Kits https://muirfieldcommunity.org/travis-county-community-centers-run-out-of-free-covid-19-home-test-kits/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 20:57:47 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/travis-county-community-centers-run-out-of-free-covid-19-home-test-kits/ TRAVIS COUNTY, Texas – Travis County officials say they are running out of free in-home COVID-19 test kits they were offering to the public by appointment only at community centers across the county. Officials say they know when their next shipment of tests will arrive. Residents had been advised to call the community center most […]]]>

Travis County officials say they are running out of free in-home COVID-19 test kits they were offering to the public by appointment only at community centers across the county. Officials say they know when their next shipment of tests will arrive.

Residents had been advised to call the community center most convenient for them to make an appointment. The centers were to be open until 1 p.m. on Wednesday, December 22 and reopen on Monday, December 27. Officials did not say whether the centers would reopen on the 27th.

The following locations offered the kits for pickup:

  • Del Valle: South Community Center at 3518 FM 973 in Del Valle, dial 512-854-1520
  • Manor: Eastern Rural Community Center at 600 W Carrie Manor St. in Manor, dial 512-854-1550
  • Jonestown: Center communautaire rural du Nord-Ouest at 18649 FM 1431, Ste 6A in Jonestown, call 512-854-1500
  • Hill Oak: West Rural Community Center at 8656 SH 71, Ste 100 in Austin, call 512-854-2130
  • Pflugerville: North Rural Community Center at 15822 Foothill Farms Loop in Pflugerville, dial 512-854-1530
  • Austin Center: 5325 Airport Blvd in Austin, call 512-854-4120

The county says the test kits expire on Jan.31.

A map of Travis County Community Centers is available here or below:

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Coming community centers in all sectors https://muirfieldcommunity.org/coming-community-centers-in-all-sectors/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 12:10:11 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/coming-community-centers-in-all-sectors/ Grand Noida: The Greater Noida Authority has decided to establish community centers in all areas of Greater Noida over the next three years. The most populous areas will get community centers in the first year and areas that have been sparsely populated so far will get the second and third consecutive years. The decision was […]]]>

Grand Noida: The Greater Noida Authority has decided to establish community centers in all areas of Greater Noida over the next three years. The most populous areas will get community centers in the first year and areas that have been sparsely populated so far will get the second and third consecutive years. The decision was announced by Narendra Bhushan, CEO of the Greater Noida Authority in a meeting with the Greater Noida Federation of RWAs and RWA representatives from various sectors on Monday.

Credit: Supplied

Community centers will be set up gradually and each center will have a different design. These centers will be designed to have club facilities, adequate parking and a common room. Two rooms will also be built in each community center that will help RWAs to conduct their official meetings or other community events.

Read also | Supertech Eco Village 2: protest by residents against the pending register

Other community issues were also discussed during the meeting. In some areas, there have been complaints about the non-connection of sewer lines to the STP, on which the CEO has asked the sewer department to take action. Apart from this, the CEO also gave instructions to install direction signs to go from the main roads to the respective sectors and signs for the blocks inside the sector. Instructions have been given to clean up vacant plots in the sectors and impose a penalty on the owner of this plot.

Devendra Tiger Advocate, President of the Rwa Greater Noida Federation, said: “On Monday we had a meeting with the officials of the Greater Noida Authority, we raised several issues with them. We called for community centers, mother dairies, because there are many areas which are very old but still lack these basic equipments. We also require CCTV cameras in crowded intersections on which the Authority has assured that they will do what is necessary. One of the main issues we raised was around the connectivity of the NMRC and DMRC. Because the Greater Noida metro does not go directly to the botanical garden which is once again very problematic ”.

Denesh Bhatti, Lawyer, RWA Member, Delta 3, Greater Noida, “The roads of Greater Noida require immediate action. We have raised issues related to the cleanliness of sectoral roads. Some drains are not covered, so we raised this issue as well. In many areas, trees require pruning. We have raised many other issues of this type and we hope they will be resolved soon ”.


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Racine Community Centers to Extend Hours of Operation Next Year Thanks to Federal Grant and Community Advocacy | Local news https://muirfieldcommunity.org/racine-community-centers-to-extend-hours-of-operation-next-year-thanks-to-federal-grant-and-community-advocacy-local-news/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/racine-community-centers-to-extend-hours-of-operation-next-year-thanks-to-federal-grant-and-community-advocacy-local-news/ RACINE – The Racine municipal council voted unanimously in favor of allocating a maximum of $ 112,500 to extend the opening hours of community centers in the region. The funds will come from the federal public service Community Development Block Grant, which has not yet been officially allocated for the year 2022, but will range […]]]>

RACINE – The Racine municipal council voted unanimously in favor of allocating a maximum of $ 112,500 to extend the opening hours of community centers in the region.

The funds will come from the federal public service Community Development Block Grant, which has not yet been officially allocated for the year 2022, but will range between $ 250,000 and $ 300,000.

The purpose of the allowance is to offer extracurricular and weekend activities in order to offer young people constructive and safe activities during the coming year.

Expansion

All centers would add a total of three hours of overtime Monday through Thursday so that facilities can stay open until 8 p.m. or 9 p.m. In addition, the extended hours will include the following:

  • At least three staff from the Bryant, King and Chavez community centers, and at least two staff from the Tyler Domer and Humble Park community centers.
  • Humble Park and Tyler Domer will reopen Fridays from noon to 6 p.m. with a minimum of two staff.
  • All centers will add a total of 4 overtime hours on Saturdays with a minimum of three staff at Bryant, King and Chavez; and a minimum of two staff at Humble and Tyler Domer
  • Bryant will add 4 additional hours per week for the music program.

People also read …

Future

Jason Mars, the city’s superintendent of recreation and culture, said there are several plans underway that will give young people more opportunities to participate in their community centers.

In addition to opening gyms and multi-purpose rooms for additional programs, plans are also underway for some collaboration between the parks department and other organizations.

The first collaboration is with the Racine Public Library and the City’s information systems staff. Mars explained that the project would support public access to computers, computer programs and could possibly involve lessons in robotics, coding, or a number of other things related to technology.

He said, “This is the one we’re trying to push forward.”

A second project that is also underway involves partnering with a local nonprofit organization to bring in gaming systems, games, and computers.

Mars said the community has started a slow return to community centers following the COVID upheaval.

“The important thing is to have activities where you can still distance yourself socially and follow safety protocols,” he said.

Respond to the community

Although not specifically mentioned at Tuesday’s city council meeting, extending the hours of operation of community centers was one of the demands made at a Stop the Violence and Pray Vigil rally held. in September following a series of shootings.

The rally was organized by the Restoration Ministries and was facilitated with the help of several organizations in the region, including Racine Women for Racial Justice.






Scroggins-Powell


Kelly Scroggins-Powell, Executive Director, said, “We are grateful for this huge gain for the youth in our communities who will have access to safer spaces in neighborhood communities. “

However, she added that the demand for expanding community center opportunities was only partially met, as the other half of the demand was “the city is using endowment funds to hire local neighborhood workers who represent those served in neighborhood centers “.

The Stop the Violence rally and prayer vigil brought together many local representatives, such as: Aldermen John Tate, Maurice Horton and Marcus West and County Supervisors Nick Demske, Jody Spencer, Fabi Maldonado and Edward Santiago

“We are grateful to the representatives who witnessed the cries and concerns of the people,” said Scroggins-Powell.

She added, “Our partnership with community leaders from the Root Interfaith Coalition like Corey Prince and the clergy, namely Bishop Ford, has proven that when we come together and amplify the voices of those most affected, we get results.”

She concluded by thanking Mayor Cory Mason and Racine City Council “who honored the voice of the people”.


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Boxes of naloxone in Columbus libraries and community overdose centers https://muirfieldcommunity.org/boxes-of-naloxone-in-columbus-libraries-and-community-overdose-centers/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 11:44:38 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/boxes-of-naloxone-in-columbus-libraries-and-community-overdose-centers/ As the global pandemic continues to garner attention with new variations and uncertainty over its end, the hidden scourge of opioid addiction has also raged, quietly claiming death. Now, Columbus libraries and community centers are hoping wall mounted resuscitation stations called NaloxBox will help prevent overdose deaths. “Every death is a heartache”: Over 5,000 Ohioans […]]]>

As the global pandemic continues to garner attention with new variations and uncertainty over its end, the hidden scourge of opioid addiction has also raged, quietly claiming death.

Now, Columbus libraries and community centers are hoping wall mounted resuscitation stations called NaloxBox will help prevent overdose deaths.

“Every death is a heartache”: Over 5,000 Ohioans Died From Drug Overdose In 2020

Due to supply chain issues, the Franklin County Alcohol, Drugs and Mental Health Council (ADAMH) had problems getting the equipment delivered, even though funding was secured by through the opioid response program, said Shelly Hoffman, spokesperson for ADAMH.

“There were over 800 deaths in Franklin County in 2020, a 47% increase from the previous year,” Hoffman said. “We now have the resources and the equipment is there.”


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Editorial: For Richmond Pandemic Relief, Community Centers Work Best When Community Is Stable | Editorial https://muirfieldcommunity.org/editorial-for-richmond-pandemic-relief-community-centers-work-best-when-community-is-stable-editorial/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/editorial-for-richmond-pandemic-relief-community-centers-work-best-when-community-is-stable-editorial/ Other members had initially proposed transferring more funds to other critical areas, such as rent assistance, direct emergency assistance to families, increasing broadband, subsidies for public transport. community and homeless services. But as the Times-Dispatch reported, a majority in a 7-2 poll approved the continuation of the spending plan proposed by Mayor Levar Stoney. In […]]]>

Other members had initially proposed transferring more funds to other critical areas, such as rent assistance, direct emergency assistance to families, increasing broadband, subsidies for public transport. community and homeless services. But as the Times-Dispatch reported, a majority in a 7-2 poll approved the continuation of the spending plan proposed by Mayor Levar Stoney.

In Richmond, community centers come under the umbrella of social services, and serious work is needed for those in underserved neighborhoods. The TB Smith Center on Ruffin Road was built in 1990, has a small footprint, and has steel grilles on its windows, suggesting that door locks are not enough.

Calhoun, owned by the Richmond Redevelopment and Housing Authority, was built in 1970 and sits across from Richmond’s largest public housing community, Gilpin Court. At least one organization renting space in Calhoun told RTD Opinions that the building does not have heating or a working elevator. Its swimming pool has been closed for a decade. Southside, built in 1975, has been the focal point of redevelopment plans for years.

City officials say ARPA funding will help turn them into “centers of opportunity” or centers offering more public services, financial assistance and housing, senior services, access to food, health care, wellness education, youth programs and workforce development and training, according to the city’s website.


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Libraries are community centers – Grady Newsource https://muirfieldcommunity.org/libraries-are-community-centers-grady-newsource/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 18:10:33 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/libraries-are-community-centers-grady-newsource/     CORRECTION: “Everyday Readers” is an adult literacy program. A previous version of the story misspelled the program’s name, and Grady Newsource regrets the error.     The automatic sliding doors open with a whoosh. Books are neatly stacked on the hold shelves, waiting for readers to come and retrieve them. The stairs take you […]]]>
    CORRECTION: “Everyday Readers” is an adult literacy program. A previous version of the story misspelled the program’s name, and Grady Newsource regrets the error.  

 

The automatic sliding doors open with a whoosh. Books are neatly stacked on the hold shelves, waiting for readers to come and retrieve them. The stairs take you up to rows upon rows of books of all different sizes, some skinny, some wide, some heavy tomes. Bright lights illuminate the spines, and the air conditioning provides the only discernible sound in the quiet space. People work, read and rest at tables warmed by sunlight, and armchairs provide the perfect place for readers to curl up with a book and dive into a story.

 Why It’s Newsworthy: Today’s libraries are more than just books on shelves. Whether you want to start your own business, apply for a passport, learn more about your family history, play chess or improve your literacy skills, the library has something for you. The Athens Regional Library System provides valuable programming and resources to the residents of Athens-Clarke, Franklin, Madison, Oconee and Oglethorpe counties. 

Libraries in 2021

Most people associate libraries with checking out books and using their library card, but the resources don’t stop there. Patrons of the Athens-Clarke County Library have access to the Digital Media Center, passport services and programming like literacy programs for adults and children.

The Athens-Clarke branch on Baxter Street in Athens, Georgia is the main branch for the 11 libraries spread across the five counties. Here, patrons can find extensive resources like computers equipped with Adobe and GarageBand software, a 3D printer and can even digitally convert their old VHS tapes. You can drop in to use these resources during regular hours or even schedule time to receive personalized help with this technology.

“As society changes and the norms of society changes, so does the public library,” said Valerie Bell, executive director of the Athens Regional Library System.

What does this mean for you as a library patron? All of these resources are available to use either at no cost or a low cost. For example, the entire Adobe Creative Cloud comes with a hefty price tag of $29.99 a month for individuals. However, everyone from students to small business owners can save money by accessing the software at the library for free.

The library system and its services allow patrons to continue to learn, grow and discover.

“People come here with questions, you know, and we help them find the answers,” said Rhiannon Eades, public information officer for the Athens Regional Library System.

In 2017, the Athens Regional Library System was named the Georgia Public Library of the year. This award is presented by the Georgia Public Library Service each year and is usually only presented to a single branch. This was the first time it was presented to an entire regional system.

This bar chart shows the range of patron visits and patrons registered at each branch in the Athens Regional Library System (Graphic/Caroline Kurzawa).

Libraries as Community Centers

On most days, you can walk into the library and find active programming, anything from a genealogy class to a teen craft club. The pandemic has paused some in-person programming and decreased attendance. However, staff is bridging the gap by streaming some services online and offering some outside like the Outdoor Musical Storytime for children.

“But really libraries, they really are community centers,” Eades said.

This sentiment underlies the sheer amount of programming and resources available across the different branches. While the main branch in Athens offers substantial programming, speciality resources can be found at the Pinewoods Library off of Highway 29.

This bilingual library, located in the Pinewood Estates North mobile home park, caters to Spanish speakers and offers services like translations, government-program application assistance and English literacy services to its patrons. In 2010, the library partnered with the Athens Land Trust and Professor Paul Duncan within the University of Georgia’s Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute to build and maintain a traditional community garden. 

At the end of the day, the library branches serve as spaces for community members to engage and learn. In fact, Eades’ favorite thing about the library is its ability to include everyone by providing such an open and welcoming space. 

“We’re here for everybody in the community,” Eades said. 

Exploring the Programming

Children dance, sing and listen to stories during Outdoor Musical Storytime. Adults improve upon their literacy skills in Everyday Readers. Chess players, young and old, engage in open chess play. This is just a sampling of the programming that can be found at Athens-Clarke County Library.

The move to an outdoor setting for children’s storytime was a product of the pandemic that still continues today. While it was something the children’s department did once a month, the program has become more regular as other storytime sessions have moved online.

The outdoor space in Memorial Park allows the children to move around freely, dancing and singing to their hearts’ content while they listen to Evan Bush, the children’s librarian for Athens-Clarke County Library and regional children’s services coordinator, sing songs, speak rhymes and read stories. 

“It’s not just for the children. It’s actually for everyone in the family,” Bush said.

This brief video provides an overview of outdoor musical story time in Memorial Park. It is led by Evan Bush on Wednesday mornings, weather permitting. The final outdoor musical story hour of the season took place on November 24. (Video shot by Jeremy Person and created by Anna Jefferson).

This brief video provides an overview of outdoor musical story time in Memorial Park. It is led by Evan Bush on Wednesday mornings, weather permitting. The final outdoor musical story hour of the season took place on November 24. (Video shot by Jeremy Person and created by Anna Jefferson).

Bush explained that this early literacy activity helps children understand “nuances of language” and also helps parents and other caregivers understand how to read aloud to their child to successfully develop their language skills.

An adult literacy program, Everyday Readers, is hosted at the Athens-Clarke County Library and helps adults improve their reading, writing, listening and vocabulary skills. Students in the program may have had reading experience in the past, and others may not. The volunteers who run the program encourage participation and learning through traditional learning activities and more creative outlets.

The class has studied folk tales, adventures and love stories, practiced vocabulary cards and most recently worked on quilts where they illustrated important moments in their lives before creating autobiographies.

Jackie Saindon, a retired teacher, is one of three volunteers who run the Everyday Readers program. She explained that this program not only develops literacy skills, but also encourages greater community participation.

” They read. They are getting involved, ”Saindon said.

Students can read local news and hold topical conversations, engaging more deeply in the community.

Chess and community, a nonprofit and youth development organization, also uses space at the library to play open chess on Monday afternoons. The Open Chess Game is an invitation for chess players of all ages and skill levels to come together and learn more about the game.

The long, open room is filled with tables with chess boards, and giant chess pieces are spread out on the floor for more interactive play.

Lemuel “Life” LaRoche, Executive Director of Chess and Community, explained how important it is to have a “neutral place” like the library for the organization to come together, a place where everyone feels safe and secure. welcome. Holding meetings in the library also serves as an introduction for the children to all that the library has to offer.

While the Everyday Readers and Chess and Community programs are not sponsored by the library system, they do emphasize the importance of library space and the benefits it provides to the community.

Make social connections

Some library programs meet the needs of patrons in ways that others cannot. For example, the Library transformation based on trauma is a decentralized initiative funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, an independent federal agency that provides grants to libraries across the country.

TILT focuses on training library employees in trauma-informed care, which means they have the same consciousness as a social worker and can do some of the same things. According to Rebecca Cordero, the only TILT employee at the Athens-Clarke County Library, this includes assisting clients with housing inquiries for low-income people, compiling databases of local pantries. and free medical clinics and assistance for visually impaired clients to navigate the Athens-Clarke public transport. .

“Before the pandemic, there were five to seven social work interns with [the University of Georgia], with the School of Social Work. And they were here in the library… at least five days a week, ”Cordero said. “So basically I was just helping them with the database and gathering information from the local community. And now it’s just me. “

When TILT was in full swing, Cordero and the interns were able to organize presentation events at the library to inform patrons of the services available. Due to the pandemic, there are fewer resources to educate people about TILT, and with fewer staff, Cordero is single-handedly doing the work of several people to help many more.

Cordero’s work as a TILT employee also helps library users who live with homelessness and mental illness, and because care is primarily focused on helping people, it has wide appeal.

“We had so many customers stopping by and asking about TILT… just being there in the lobby was very informative for a lot of customers. Even customers who didn’t need the information we were posting, just community members who were like, ‘this is fantastic!’ “Cordero said.

How libraries are funded

The programs available at the Athens-Clarke County Library and other branches of the system depend on funding to provide consistent resources. Funding is shared between federal, state and local funds and grants. The main federal funding resource is the State grant program. According to their website, more than $ 150 million is distributed among the administrative agencies of state libraries, which are official institutions specially designed to expand and develop the services of national libraries.

At the local level, libraries are labeled as independent agencies, and their budget requests are considered when the local budget for the year is under construction. While library funding has increased over the years, the current rate of increase cannot support the continued growth and programs they seek to deliver to communities.

“Funding is an issue for libraries across the country,” Bell said.

For the Athens regional library system, most of the funding goes to staff salaries, and Bell would like to be able to have a sufficient budget to be able to hire specialist librarians such as outreach and business librarians who can serve in the area. niche areas.

“They’re considered an independent agency, and they come to us every year with a budget for additional funds, and we’re always very, very open to their requests. You know, for the last few years they’ve been asking for salary increases. for their employees – library employees are noticeably underpaid – and therefore we try to ensure that all library employees at least comply with the living wage provisions of Athens-Clarke County, ”said the district commissioner 3, Melissa Link.

A glance at the figures shows that the financing of the whole Georgia Public Library System for fiscal 2020 was $ 225,807,139. During the same financial year, the share of the independent agency in the Athens-Clarke County Budget was 4% or $ 5,574,443, an increase of only 1.4%.

While the local government supports the growth of the system, albeit at a slow pace, it is the state budget that gives rise to concerns about the future of Georgian libraries. The state budget for the proposed 2021 fiscal year $ 3.1 million in cuts in public libraries. Cutting an already limited budget hurts not only the various library systems, but also the residents of the state who depend on their resources and programming.

Turn the page

As the Athens Regional Library System continues to provide resources to residents of the counties they serve, the system also continues to grow in size.

Because even if state funding is reduced by the millions, local funding has been allocated for a new library east of Athens-Clarke County. This new branch will provide meeting space and access to technology for residents of Athens who cannot easily access other branches.

The function of a library in 2021 goes far beyond just reading a book. The Athens Regional Library System provides an overview of everything libraries provide to their communities, from high quality technology to literacy classes.

When it feels like things are going downhill, libraries find ways to bring community members together in a space that welcomes everyone.

Anna Jefferson, Caroline Kurzawa, Jeter Long, and Jeremy Person are senior journalism students at the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia.


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New LGBTQ Community Centers Offering Resources and Representation in Louisville | News https://muirfieldcommunity.org/new-lgbtq-community-centers-offering-resources-and-representation-in-louisville-news/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/new-lgbtq-community-centers-offering-resources-and-representation-in-louisville-news/ LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – Louisville’s LGBTQ community will soon have two new resource and advocacy locations – one with a particular focus on homeless LGBTQ youth. A mansion in old Louisville is being converted into the first LGBTQ center Louisville has seen in over 30 years. “A few years ago there was a Gallup poll […]]]>

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – Louisville’s LGBTQ community will soon have two new resource and advocacy locations – one with a particular focus on homeless LGBTQ youth.

A mansion in old Louisville is being converted into the first LGBTQ center Louisville has seen in over 30 years.

“A few years ago there was a Gallup poll that said Louisville was, I think, the 11th most LGBTQ populous city, so we know there is a population here that needs this center and the support, ”said Mike Slaton, Executive Director. of Louisville pride.

The Asia Institute’s Crane House, which currently occupies the building, will move its offices to the first floor only, allowing the second and third floors to be reserved for the LGBTQ center.

“An LGBT community center makes it much easier to connect with other people in the community and access the resources you need,” Slaton said.






A room currently occupied by the Asia Institute which will soon be part of the LGBT Center


The building has 7,500 square feet of space to accommodate conference rooms, offices and community events.

Mental health and financial counselors will also be available. The project was made possible by private and corporate sponsors, as well as grants.

“Kentucky has a huge LGBT community, especially in Louisville, so I want people to know that and I think having a center is one of the greatest things we could have done for the community.” said Derek Guy, a volunteer at the center.

A few miles from Barret Avenue – a former dentist’s office will be Sweet Evening Breeze’s new location – which will help homeless LGBTQ youth or those with unstable households.






LGBT Homeless Youth Center

Inside this building is where Sweet Evening Breeze will operate its new center for homeless LGBTQ youth.


“We’ve got a lot of work to do, a lot of painting, a lot of furniture here, computers, stuff like that, but we’re on the right track,” said Ariel Brooks, Sweet Evening Breeze board member. . “We have a very large base of volunteers who are ready as soon as we are ready to go to help us do it all. “

While the teens will not be residing at the Avenue Barret location, the office will provide vocational training and have a therapy dog.

“Louisville’s LGBT community is large, strong and united, which we really want to show as a united force,” Guy said.

The community center and homeless youth center are slated to open in the first quarter of next year.

Copyright 2021 WDRB Media. All rights reserved.


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For Salvadorans in the Phoenix metro, pupuserias become community centers https://muirfieldcommunity.org/for-salvadorans-in-the-phoenix-metro-pupuserias-become-community-centers/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 13:58:14 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/for-salvadorans-in-the-phoenix-metro-pupuserias-become-community-centers/ Lee in spanish Jessica Blanco was only 13 when she moved to Phoenix from her home in El Salvador. It was in 2011. She didn’t know anyone when she arrived; his whole family was nearly 2,500 miles away. “I felt very disconnected from moving here, not just physically. I’ve tried joining a community, you know […]]]>

Lee in spanish

Jessica Blanco was only 13 when she moved to Phoenix from her home in El Salvador. It was in 2011. She didn’t know anyone when she arrived; his whole family was nearly 2,500 miles away.

“I felt very disconnected from moving here, not just physically. I’ve tried joining a community, you know everybody wants that, but I haven’t seen a lot of Salvadorans here in Arizona. I did not meet any Salvadorian in middle or high school, ”she explained.

Thanks to the food, however, many Salvadoran Arizonas born in the United States and abroad were able to regain a sense of the community they grew up in, with their families here and with those they left behind in El Salvador.

There is a huge population of Latinos in the Phoenix subway. According to the US census, nearly 43% of residents identify as Hispanic or Latino. However, the majority are Mexicans, a situation influenced by the many Mexicans who lived in the region long before the borders were established and by the mass migration flows that resumed in the 1940s.

In the 1980s, the United States saw migratory patterns accelerate from El Salvador as its civil war began to unfold. California is home to the largest number of Salvadorans living abroad – more than 700,000, according to the 2019 US Census. By comparison, Arizona had fewer than 20,000 Salvadoran residents during the same period.

For many, like Blanco, finding a community in Phoenix that resonates with their Salvadoran roots proved difficult upon arrival. According to the owners of pupuserías in the valley, the food from their country of origin helps to create a meeting point for them.

According to Miriam Ramírez, owner of El Salvadoreño # 2 restaurant, located on 75th Avenue and Thomas Road in Phoenix, ordering a loroco-based pupusa is a strong indication that you are Salvadoran.

She said there aren’t many ways to identify Salvadorans in the Phoenix area – if their Salvadoran heritage isn’t detectable in the way they speak, then they will surely understand it in the way they speak. they command their pupusas.

Not many people know what loroco is, Ramírez said. It is an aromatic flower that grows in El Salvador and when mixed with cheese and hot corn dough that makes pupusa, gives the dish a unique and delicious flavor.

This is precisely the food that brings Salvadorans together in the Phoenix area, Ramírez said. Restaurants, like the chain she runs with her daughter Yesenia Ramírez, serve as meeting points for Salvadoran families who find this connection to their culture in the cuisine of their country.

“There are second or third generation Salvadorans. You may not see them in the street with a flag, you cannot identify them at first glance,” Yesenia Ramírez said. “But when they see a pupusa restaurant, they remember the food their grandmother made for them, and they quickly associate these flavors with their traditions, their culture, their family.”

In 2005, pupusas was declared the national dish of El Salvador. The second Sunday in November has been declared National Pupusa Day.

Around the valley, authentic Salvadoran restaurants aren’t too hard to find. The majority, however, are in Phoenix. Miriam Ramírez’s Salvadoreño restaurant chain operates in Phoenix, Mesa and El Mirage, with a sixth location soon in Tempe. Others like Restaurant Guañaquitos, Restaurant Salvadoreño y Pupuseria Los 3 Hermanos and Restaurant Reina de las Pupusas are also located in Phoenix.

Along with cheese-based pupusas, chicharrón and the combination of cheese and beans, loroco pupusas are among the most requested dishes at Miriam Ramírez’s restaurant. It opened in 2002 and has served thousands of Latinos and non-Latinos in the Valley.

But the culinary ingenuity of Salvadorans went further, and over time the dish included endless flavors such as chicken, chorizo, ham, meat, and even shrimp.

“We make it with pepperoni and cheese which is flavorful, and customers in Phoenix love them,” said Yesenia Ramírez.

The pupusas are accompanied by a marinated concoction of cabbage, carrot, chili, onion and vinegar.

Unlike large cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Washington, where hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans live, there is no designated neighborhood or area in Phoenix where the Salvadoran community is concentrated.

“In Los Angeles you see the vast majority around MacArthur Park, there are a lot of Salvadoran businesses there; lots of markets that make you feel like you’re in your hometown,” Yesenia Ramírez said. “It’s missing here in the Phoenix area. There are a lot of Salvadorans here, but we are all scattered. The valley is very big and wide, and there is no specific place where we live or meet.

Dr. Cecilia Menjívar, professor of sociology at the University of California at Los Angeles, focused her research on the Central American experience in the United States. In order to understand Salvadoran’s lack of visibility in the Phoenix metropolitan area, we need to understand the reasons families have migrated here, she said.

Menjívar documented the history of Central American immigration to the United States, highlighting how the political and economic difficulties of the 1970s influenced current migration patterns.

In his academic study “The Power of the Law: The Legality and Daily Life of Central Americans in Phoenix, Arizona,” Dr. Menjívar explains that “although the political conflicts officially ended in 1992 in El Salvador and in 1996 in Guatemala , immigration from the two countries has continued and is now exacerbated by the high rates of unemployment, underemployment and high levels of violence associated with “common crime” in Central America. “

The study focuses on the legal infrastructure that created the environment in which Central Americans live today. Current immigration laws, as Menjívar explains in his work, affect the daily lives of immigrants to places like El Salvador, including their ability to build community.

Like Mexicans and immigrants from other Central and South American countries, Salvadorians tend to come to the United States with the intention of staying there for a maximum of two years, thus supporting their families and returning home. shortly after. They do this “to earn money and go back to their hometown, but over time most decide to stay,” said Miriam Ramírez.

“That we stay to live here does not mean that we forget our country, our family or our roots. What we do (in the US) is think about keeping our roots alive, ”she said.

Enrique Meléndez, member of El Salvador’s diplomatic corps and former honorary consul of El Salvador in Phoenix, said Salvadorans are concentrated in Mesa, Phoenix and Tucson. And despite their small numbers in Arizona, Salvadorans created with other Latinos in the region, including Mexicans.

“The Salvadoran people of Arizona are very social … and respect other nationalities. Many of them work very hard and develop various professions – something similar to what happens with Mexicans, Hondurans and (people from) other Latin American countries, ”said Meléndez.

For Jessica Blanco, however, finding a home in Phoenix has also resulted in some form of erasure of their own culture as Salvadorans. “I think that as Salvadoran immigrants we are trying to merge with the Latino culture here, but it is as if the Mexican culture is very widespread,” he said.

Blanco, 23, said that due to the lack of knowledge of fellow Latinos in her country, she spent time educating those around her about her identity. The hegemony that Mexican identity has over how a Latino should look and be in Phoenix – and the United States – forces this kind of unlearned environment for Salvadorans and other Latinos.

“I think the Central American erasure is something major that I’ve achieved trying to navigate different groups,” she said.

Kenneth Velásquez, originally from Tucson, moved to Tempe to study architecture at Arizona State University. Like Blanco, he said he had not been exposed to much to the other Salvadorans in the Phoenix metro.

“I would say that while I have been able to connect a lot with the Latino community, I haven’t been able to connect as much with the other Salvis in particular,” he said.

Velásquez is the eldest son of immigrant parents from El Salvador. His family’s immigration story illustrates some of the trends in Central American immigrants in recent years. Her mother was granted Temporary Protected Status in 1999 and moved to Arizona shortly thereafter. Her father arrived in 2008 and continues to send funds to El Salvador to support her family to this day.

Velásquez believes he doesn’t see enough Salvadoran representation in Phoenix. Apart from his family experiences and his encounters through family ties, he does not feel that he has been able to find a community here among other Salvadorans.

“I don’t really have any contact with the Salvi community here yet,” he explained. “The only real connections I have had with the community are through pupuserias and a football game, things that have a direct link to the country.”

Velásquez’s experience is one that Miriam and Yesenia Ramírez understand. For this very reason, restaurants that specialize in Salvadoran cuisine, their way of keeping their “roots alive,” provide that space that Salvadorans need to create community, they said.

With no official consular office in Phoenix, the closest being in Tucson and then Los Angeles, Salvadoran restaurants in the valley offer their dining halls as consular service locations when staff visit Tucson.

Additionally, Yesenia Ramírez helps organize the annual Arizona Pupusas Festival, one of the few events in the valley to celebrate Salvadoran culture. The event usually takes place around the famous Pupusa Day. This year, it will take place on November 13 at the Roosevelt 16 Cultural Center (1650 E Roosevelt St.) in Phoenix. The event is organized by the Cultivo Market Collective.

The event promotes Salvadoran cuisine from local restaurants, traditional live music, typical El Salvador dances, art exhibitions by local Salvadoran designers and other activities.

“A lot of people with whom we have established good relationships, we have met them either in restaurants or at events such as the Pupusa festival,” said Miriam Ramírez. “That’s the goal of this festival: to bring people together and promote our culture, and so far it has worked for us.”

Contact La Voz reporter Raphael Romero Ruiz at rromeroruiz@lavozarizona.com and editor-in-chief Javier Arce at javier.arce@lavozarizona.com. Follow them on Twitter @raphaeldelag and @ javierarce33.

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Hawaii County Announces Reopening Of Gyms And Community Centers https://muirfieldcommunity.org/hawaii-county-announces-reopening-of-gyms-and-community-centers/ https://muirfieldcommunity.org/hawaii-county-announces-reopening-of-gyms-and-community-centers/#respond Sat, 30 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://muirfieldcommunity.org/hawaii-county-announces-reopening-of-gyms-and-community-centers/ October 30, 2021, 9:12 a.m. HST * Updated November 1 at 6:33 a.m. Gyms and community centers are coming back online on the Big Island. Hawai’i County announced Friday that it will reopen those gymnasiums and community centers in county-run facilities on November 1, 2022. The Department of Parks and Recreation is also working to […]]]>

October 30, 2021, 9:12 a.m. HST
* Updated November 1 at 6:33 a.m.

Gyms and community centers are coming back online on the Big Island.

Hawai’i County announced Friday that it will reopen those gymnasiums and community centers in county-run facilities on November 1, 2022. The Department of Parks and Recreation is also working to reopen its senior centers, its senior meal sites and its senior classes by January 2022, according to a press release from the office of Big Island Mayor Mitch Roth.

“As the number of cases continues to drop, we believe it is time to start our return to normalcy by bringing our community back to our gyms and recreational facilities,” said Roth. “We know that active lifestyles contribute to a healthier immune system and can greatly improve our chances against the virus, and we’re excited to be able to safely get people back to the activities they enjoy most. In addition, we encourage organizations to request waivers so that spectators can enjoy the stands. “

County gyms and community centers will be available for scheduled and organized recreational activities, and reservations are required. Recreation directors at each facility will work with the public on reservations, sanitization protocols, and return-to-play safety plans.

For more information, including dates and times of availability, contact the appropriate Parks and Recreation facility directly, or contact the department’s recreation division at (808) 961-8740.


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